Ebenezer Sparhawk Jr. and Azubah Jepherson

Ebenezer SPARHAWK Jr., son of Rev. Ebenezer SPARKHAWK Sr. and Abigail STEARNS, was born 29 May 1764 in Templeton, Worcestor Co. MA., and died 31 Oct. 1836 at Rochester, Windsor Co. VT.

23 June 1799, in Rochester, Windsor Co. VT., Ebenezer married Azubah JEPHERSON,
daughter of Joseph JEPHERSON and Ruth EMERSON.

Azubah was born 1779 and died 19 Oct. 1847 at Rochester, Windsor Co. VT.

Ebenezer and Azubah had 11 children:

1) George b. 13 May 1800, died in 1822.

2) Rev. Samuel b. 1 Jan 1802 at Rochester, Windsor Co., VT, died 8 Nov. 1869 at
Pittsfield, Rutland Co., VT., married on 16 Nov 1824, in Rochester, Windsor
Co., VT., Laura FITTS. Laura was born 5 Jan 1805 at Leicester, VT and died 8
Feb 1899 at Bethel, Windsor Co., VT.

3) Priscilla b. 13 August 1803, Rochester, Windsor Co. VT, married Daniel WARREN. (Direct line)

4) Polly b. 23 Sept. 1805

5) Mary b. 1806 or 23 Sept. 1805, died 8 March 1844, married Luther TUCKER b. 7
May 1802, Brandon, Rutland Co., VT., and died 26 Jan 1873, at Albany, Albany
Co., NY. (His data and Mary’s death date via internet search). They were
married 14 Oct. 1833. Luther TUCKER first had married Naomi SPARHAWK, Mary’s
sister.

6) Naomi b. 19 Oct. 1807, Rochester, Windsor Co., VT., died 4 August 1832,
Albany, Albany Co., NY, married Luther TUCKER on 19 Nov. 1827. After Naomi’s
death, Luther married Mary, Naomi’s sister.

7) Ebenezer b. 1809 died 1833 at about 24.

8) Joseph b. 11 Aug 1811 died 1813

9) Martha b. 15 Feb 1814, married William ALLING.

10) Louisa b. 27 Aug 1816 at Rochester, Windsor Co., VT., married 7 Feb 1839 at
Rochester, Windsor Co., VT., Edward TERRY.

11) Infant b. 9 Aug 1819 died 9 Aug. 1819.


Husband: Ebenezer + Sparhawk Jr. (1)


Born: 1764 May 28 – Templeton, Worcester, Massachusetts
Christened:
Died: 1836 Oct 31 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont
Buried:
Father: Rev. Ebenezer + Sparhawk Sr (1738-1805) (1)
Mother: Abigail + Stearns (1740-1772)
Marriage: 1799 Jun 23 Place: Rochester, Windsor,
Vermont (2)


Events


1. Census: 1790 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont.

2. Census: 1800 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (3)

1800 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER CENSUS
Joseph JEFFERSON 1 2 – – 1 / 1 2 3 1 –
Isaac PUTNAM
Ebeneser MORE?
Ammi ?
Ichabod? JEFFERSON 3 – – 1 – / 1 – – 1
Amos ROOT
Retin? TRACK?
David WARREN 4 – – 1 – / 1 – – 1
Daniel SHEIN?
John RANSOM?
Cephas SHELDON
John WHITCOMB
Elisha HUBBARD
Daniel EMMERSON
Jonathon JEWEL?
Robert WILEY
Silas? McWRIN?
? ROOT
Stephen RONSOM?
Simon ?
David AUSTIN
Enoch EMMERSON?
Moses WHIPPLE
Clark ?
Elisabeth or Eliphant ? MORSE
Nathan? CHANDLER
John AUSTIN
Ebenezer SPARHAWK 1 1 1 1 – / – – 1
Robert HEATH
Robert HUSS

3. Census: 1810 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (4)

1810 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER CENSUS
pg. 545
Reuben BROWN
Daniel SHEW Jr.
Abijah AUSTIN
Nathl BUSH
Enoch EMMERSON 2 1 3 – 1 / 2 1 – 1
Ebenr. SPARHAWK 2 1 1 – 1 / 3 – 1 1
John POWERS
James WING
Leonard TAILOR
Thomas DUNBAR
Daniel ?
Theodore BROCKETT
Ebenezer STACY
Josiah MCWAINE
Enoch MOSHER
Reuben LAMB
Ichabod JEFFERSON 2 2 1 1 – / 1 – – 1 1
Joseph JEFFERSON – 1 – – 1 / – 1 1 – 1
Ebenr. MORSE

pg. 546
Stephen CHANDLER
John EMMERSON
Abel CHILD
Joseph JEFFERSON Jr.
Samuel ANTHONY
Joseph BOICE
Daniel SHEW?
Davies GLEASON
Ephraim BAKER
David WARREN – 2 1 1 – / 3 – – 1
Ebenr. MORGAN
Henry SPARHAWK 3 1 – – 1 / – 2 – 1
Isaac MERY
Liber? WASHBURN

4. Census: 1820 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (5)

1820 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER TOWNSHIP CENSUS
Daniel GLEASON
Peter WILDER
Joseph JEPHERSON 2 3 – – 1 – 1 – 1 1 – – 1
Smith INGALLS
James WINE
Ebenezer SPARHAWK – 1 – 2 – 1 2 2 1 1 1 – 3
Jared HALL
Lois BOYCE
Calvin MORSE
Seth CAREY
Nathan AUSTIN Jr.
Ezra WASHBURN
John MCALLASTER
William MCALLASTER
James FOWL
Carty HALL
William BAKER
William NELSON
Daniel JONES
Stephen PARKER
Lemuel ROOT
Eliakin ROOT
Oliver SUGER
Clark YOUNGS
John JONES
Josiah YOUNGS
David WARREN – – – – – 1 1 2 1 – 1 – 1
John WARREN
John ODGE
Rufus MARTIN
Charles MORSE
John W. DIKE

5. Census: 1830 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont.

6. Note: Diary 1784 – 1789 summarized by Dorothy McClure, 1784-1789.

10. Note: Diary 1793, 1793. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1793

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

11. Note: Diary 1794, 1794. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1794

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

12. Note: Diary 1795, 1795. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1795

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

13. Note: Diary 1796, 1796. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1796

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

14. Note: Diary 1797, 1797. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1797

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

15. Note: Diary 1798, 1798. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1798

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

16. Note: Diary 1799, 1799. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1799

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

17. Note: Diary 1800, 1800. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1800

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

18. Note: Diary 1813, 1813. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1813

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure

19. Note: Diary 1814, 1814. Summary of Ebenezer SPARHAWK’s diary

Year 1814

Summarized by Dorothy Mitchell McClure


Wife: Azubah + Jepherson (1)


Born: 1779
Christened:
Died: 1847 Oct 19 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (1)
Buried:
Father: Joseph + Jepherson (1751-1813) (6)
Mother: Ruth + Emerson (1758-1845)


Events


1. Census: 1800 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (3)

1800 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER CENSUS
Joseph JEFFERSON 1 2 – – 1 / 1 2 3 1 –
Isaac PUTNAM
Ebeneser MORE?
Ammi ?
Ichabod? JEFFERSON 3 – – 1 – / 1 – – 1
Amos ROOT
Retin? TRACK?
David WARREN 4 – – 1 – / 1 – – 1
Daniel SHEIN?
John RANSOM?
Cephas SHELDON
John WHITCOMB
Elisha HUBBARD
Daniel EMMERSON
Jonathon JEWEL?
Robert WILEY
Silas? McWRIN?
? ROOT
Stephen RONSOM?
Simon ?
David AUSTIN
Enoch EMMERSON?
Moses WHIPPLE
Clark ?
Elisabeth or Eliphant ? MORSE
Nathan? CHANDLER
John AUSTIN
Ebenezer SPARHAWK 1 1 1 1 – / – – 1
Robert HEATH
Robert HUSS

2. Census: 1810 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (4)

1810 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER CENSUS
pg. 545
Reuben BROWN
Daniel SHEW Jr.
Abijah AUSTIN
Nathl BUSH
Enoch EMMERSON 2 1 3 – 1 / 2 1 – 1
Ebenr. SPARHAWK 2 1 1 – 1 / 3 – 1 1
John POWERS
James WING
Leonard TAILOR
Thomas DUNBAR
Daniel ?
Theodore BROCKETT
Ebenezer STACY
Josiah MCWAINE
Enoch MOSHER
Reuben LAMB
Ichabod JEFFERSON 2 2 1 1 – / 1 – – 1 1
Joseph JEFFERSON – 1 – – 1 / – 1 1 – 1
Ebenr. MORSE

pg. 546
Stephen CHANDLER
John EMMERSON
Abel CHILD
Joseph JEFFERSON Jr.
Samuel ANTHONY
Joseph BOICE
Daniel SHEW?
Davies GLEASON
Ephraim BAKER
David WARREN – 2 1 1 – / 3 – – 1
Ebenr. MORGAN
Henry SPARHAWK 3 1 – – 1 / – 2 – 1
Isaac MERY
Liber? WASHBURN

3. Census: 1820 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (5)

1820 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER TOWNSHIP CENSUS
Daniel GLEASON
Peter WILDER
Joseph JEPHERSON 2 3 – – 1 – 1 – 1 1 – – 1
Smith INGALLS
James WINE
Ebenezer SPARHAWK – 1 – 2 – 1 2 2 1 1 1 – 3
Jared HALL
Lois BOYCE
Calvin MORSE
Seth CAREY
Nathan AUSTIN Jr.
Ezra WASHBURN
John MCALLASTER
William MCALLASTER
James FOWL
Carty HALL
William BAKER
William NELSON
Daniel JONES
Stephen PARKER
Lemuel ROOT
Eliakin ROOT
Oliver SUGER
Clark YOUNGS
John JONES
Josiah YOUNGS
David WARREN – – – – – 1 1 2 1 – 1 – 1
John WARREN
John ODGE
Rufus MARTIN
Charles MORSE
John W. DIKE


Children


1 M George Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1800 May 13
Christened:
Died: 1822 (1)
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


2 M Rev. Samuel Sparhawk
Born: 1802 Jan 1 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (1)
Christened:
Died: 1869 Nov 8 – Pittsfield, Rutland, Vermont (2)
Buried:
Spouse: Laura Fitts (1805-1899) (1)
Marr. Date: 1824 Nov 16 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (2)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


3 F Priscilla + Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1803 Aug 13 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (2)
Christened:
Died: 1854 Dec 27 – , , Vermont
Buried:
Spouse: Rev. Daniel + Warren (1798-1864) (1)
Marr. Date: 1826 Jan 28 – , Essex, Vermont
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Census: 1810 Rochester, Windsor, Vermont. (4)

1810 VERMONT WINDSOR
ROCHESTER CENSUS
pg. 545
Reuben BROWN
Daniel SHEW Jr.
Abijah AUSTIN
Nathl BUSH
Enoch EMMERSON 2 1 3 – 1 / 2 1 – 1
Ebenr. SPARHAWK 2 1 1 – 1 / 3 – 1 1
John POWERS
James WING
Leonard TAILOR
Thomas DUNBAR
Daniel ?
Theodore BROCKETT
Ebenezer STACY
Josiah MCWAINE
Enoch MOSHER
Reuben LAMB
Ichabod JEFFERSON 2 2 1 1 – / 1 – – 1 1
Joseph JEFFERSON – 1 – – 1 / – 1 1 – 1
Ebenr. MORSE

pg. 546
Stephen CHANDLER
John EMMERSON
Abel CHILD
Joseph JEFFERSON Jr.
Samuel ANTHONY
Joseph BOICE
Daniel SHEW?
Davies GLEASON
Ephraim BAKER
David WARREN – 2 1 1 – / 3 – – 1
Ebenr. MORGAN
Henry SPARHAWK 3 1 – – 1 / – 2 – 1
Isaac MERY
Liber? WASHBURN

2. Census: 1850 Bakersfield, Franklin, Vermont. (7)

Source Citation:
Year: 1850; Census Place: Bakersfield, Franklin, Vermont; Roll: M432_924;
Page: 49; Image: 98.
1/1 Julius P. SEWARD Lawyer 26 b. VT
Louisa 21
Daniel WARREN 52 congregational Preiest $2000
Priscilla 47
Elizabeth 23
Joseph 21
Henry 15
Everts 15
Ellen 11
1/1 Rollin C.M. WOODWARD and family


4 F Polly Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1805 Sep 23
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


5 F Mary Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1805 Sep 23 or 1806
Christened:
Died: 1844 Mar 8 (2)
Buried:
Spouse: Luther Tucker (1802-1873) (1)
Marr. Date: 1833 Oct 14 (2)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


6 F Naomi Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1807 Oct 19 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont
Christened:
Died: 1832 Aug 4 – Albany, Albany, New York (2)
Buried:
Spouse: Luther Tucker (1802-1873) (1)
Marr. Date: 1827 Nov 19 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (2)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


7 M Ebenezer Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1809
Christened:
Died: 1833 (8)
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


8 M Joseph Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1811 Aug 11
Christened:
Died: 1813
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


9 F Martha Sparhawk (1)
Born: 1814 Feb 15
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse: William Alling (1814- ) (1)
Marr. Date:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


10 F Louisa Sparhawk
Born: 1816 Aug 27 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (1)
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse: Edward Terry (1816- )
Marr. Date: 1839 Feb 7 – Rochester, Windsor, Vermont (2)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


11 M Sparhawk
Born: 1819 Aug 9 (1)
Christened:
Died: 1819 Aug 9
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:



General Notes: Husband – Ebenezer + Sparhawk Jr.



http://www.ourherald.com/News/2001/0823/Front_Page/f03.html gives the following
story of the Congregational Church of Rochester which mentions Ebenezer
SPARHAWK:

Church of Rochester Celebrates Two Centuries ‘Built on the Rock’

Just 20 years after Gov. Thomas Chittenden granted a charter for the township
of Rochester on July 31, 1781, the Congregational Church was organized Sept.
11, 1801. Two centuries later, now known as the Federated Church of Rochester,
it’s gearing up for a gala bicentennial celebration.

With Articles of Faith drafted by Daniel SHAW, Enoch EMERSON and Ebenezer
SPARHAWK, the church initially had 30 members. There was no settled minister
then and the group relied upon traveling preachers or supply ministers from
other towns, meeting in private homes.

When the Methodists were organized in 1803, both churches held their services
in the “Pot Ash” meeting house on the “common” (now known as the “park”), with
the Methodists meeting after the Congregationalists were done.

The Congregationalists’ first choir director, Jeremiah Ingalls, was a talented
man who became a famous composer. His music book, “The Christian Harmony,” was
published in 1804 and choirs still sing some of his works.

In the first decade of the 1800s, Rochester saw a “mini” industrial revolution
when a carding machine and leather tannery were added to the gristmills already
in place. More people came to settle and the congregations of both churches
grew along with the town.

In 1811, the Congregational church site was leveled on the hill just across the
road from the common and one observer noted that “a more beautiful site for a
meeting house is not to be found in any village in the state.” Perhaps
symbolizing the solidity of their faith, the congregation built their church on
a ledge of rock, which can still be seen today jutting out into the Federated
Church furnace room. A simple structure with one floor and high galleries on
three sides, it was completed in 1813.

The congregation purchased the first parsonage on the northeast corner of the
common in 1822, where the present parsonage (built in 1866 at a cost of $1,600)
is located today.

A belfry and steeple were added to the church building in 1825, with the funds
raised by subscription. This first steeple was adorned with a gilded dome that
was a landmark for many years, and the 702-lb. bell was cast at the Paul Revere
Foundry in Massachusetts. A later steeple, erected in 1895 on the northeast
corner of the church, was 108 ft. high and visible from many parts of the
valley for nearly 50 years.

In 1849, the galleries were removed and the building remodeled so that the
upper floor could be used for church purposes and the lower floor leased for
Town Meetings, a practice that continued until 1937.

Meanwhile, the Universalists had organized in 1822, meeting at the home of
Ephriam Dean Briggs, who lived on the site of the present Park House. They
joined forces with the Methodists to erect a church building (now a private
home on Main Street just south of the Park House) in 1827, and shared quarters
for two decades, before the Methodists bought out the Universalist share in the
building in 1848 to accommodate their rapidly growing congregation. The
following year, the Universalists built their own church, holding services
there for 85 years.

During the Civil War, W.W. Williams, who would later write the first history of
Rochester, read war news to anxious townspeople from the front steps of the
church.

Women’s suffrage was becoming an important issue nationwide; and locally,
women’s names began to appear on the church rolls as clerks and committee
members. The Ladies Aid of the Rochester Universalist Church was formed in 1867
with the goal of raising funds and working to help out the church and the
community in any way they could. This mission is carried on today by the
Federated Church’s very active Women’s Alliance.

1898 saw both the Congregationalists and Methodists deciding to have their
churches wired for electric lights by the Rochester Electric Light & Power Co.

In 1901, the Congregational Church celebrated its centennial with the
publication of a 72-page history of the church and four days of activities,
including a sermon given by Rev. Willis L. Sparhawk, (great-grandson of
Ebenezer Sparhawk), social events, and music, including a centennial hymn
composed for the occasion by Electa Webber Morse.

During the 1920s and into the 1930s, there were many discussions regarding
uniting the three congregations. When they finally federated in 1934, the
Universalist Church became the home of the Rochester Public Library. The pews
were removed from the Methodist church building and it became a gymnasium for
the school. Classrooms for grades 1-4 were also located there until the present
elementary school opened in 1956.

Trial by Fire

The most traumatic event in the history of the church took place just ten years
after the valley’s three Protestant denominations decided to band together as
the Federated Church of Rochester. On Saturday night, Dec. 30, 1944, the church
was destroyed in a dramatic fire.

The custodian had built up a fire in the furnace to warm the sanctuary for
Sunday services and thinking everything was fine, went on home. Unfortunately,
that wasn’t the case. Volunteer firefighters from both Rochester and Hancock
battled the blaze, and although the church building itself was a total loss,
they were successful in saving nearby residences.

94-year-old Lillian Marsh recalls standing in dismay that night in the kitchen
window of the Marsh farmhouse, a mile or so north of the village, watching the
orange glow coming from the village.

“When the steeple burned, it looked like a huge candle,” she remembered. Other
onlookers, watching the fire from the south side of the church, told of seeing
a huge timber fall with a shorter crosspiece attached. It toppled onto the
cement porch and came to rest leaning against the belfry: a perfect cross,
until it was consumed by the flames.

Many older church members tell the story of an elderly lady, Lilla Baker, who
lived in the village and was very hard of hearing. She had obviously missed the
noise and excitement the night before, and since she had a habit of walking
with her eyes focused on the ground, got quite a shock when, after trudging up
the hill to church the next morning, she raised her eyes to find it had burned
to the ground!

Services were held the next day at the library, and continued there for the
next seven years, while the people of the church worked together to rebuild the
physical symbol of their faith.

Rebuilding was a defining moment in the life of the church, foreshadowing the
success of the federation. It became a community effort. Permission was
obtained to cut spruce and hemlock logs from the Green Mountain National
Forest, and three local companies cut and sawed the lumber free of charge. Hall
Brothers of Randolph and Strafford were the building contractors and the men of
the valley worked before and after their regular jobs to carry out the plans
drawn up by architect John C. French, Jr. of Burlington, an expert on Colonial
churches.

The women of the church took on the responsibility of finishing and furnishing
the interior of the new structure, planning a series of “fun and fund-raising”
events that eventually raised over $11,000.

Perhaps most memorable among these were the four Lord’s Auctions, presided over
by well-known auctioneer Arthur Osha. Donated attic treasures, household goods,
farm animals, homemade food, farm produce, and even a pair of dueling pistols
were sold to benefit the church. Other events included art exhibits, hobby
shows, band concerts, home talent plays and church suppers, where for 50 cents,
hungry diners enjoyed a meal of meat loaf, potato salad, Harvard beets, rolls
and homemade cake.

The corner stone of verde antique marble from the Rochester quarry was laid
July 16, 1950, and although the interior of the building was unfinished, Rev.
Myron Wilder had performed the first wedding in the church (uniting Caroline
Trask and Lawrence Tilden) the previous day. At the first regular church
service in the building, also conducted by Rev. Wilder exactly five months
later, he noted that the Federated Church was “set upon the Congregational
rock, the Methodist bell rings out a welcome from the belfry and the
Universalist hand forged weathervane points direction from the spire.”

The evening before the dedication ceremony in July 1953, a pageant entitled
“T’other Town,” written by Mildred and Worth Shampeny from a story told in the
“History of Rochester” by W.W. Williams, depicted life in Rochester from
1780-1813. The 50 people in the cast included many playing the roles of their
own ancestors. (Excerpts from “T’other Town” will be performed at the Federated
Church’s 200th anniversary re-dedication ceremony Sunday, Aug. 26).

At first the congregation sat on folding chairs, but soon they were notified by
Lura Williams Wheeler, granddaughter of Rochester historian W.W. Williams, that
a church near her home in Massachusetts had old pews that could be cut down to
fit the Rochester church. Wheeler and her brother and sister also gave $500
towards chimes for the church, in memory of their grandfather (the man who read
Civil War news to the townspeople from the old church steps).

Growth and Change

The 1950s and ’60s were a time of great growth in membership for the church and
Sunday School. In 1961, the Congregational part of the church voted to accept
the constitution of the United Church of Christ. The church also sponsored
groups such as a Girl Scout troop with over 40 girls.

After a series of relatively short pastorates that followed the departure in
1953 of Rev. Wilder, who had led the church for nine years through the
rebuilding after the fire; Rev. Allan Bond, fresh from seminary, arrived for
what turned out to be another successful nine-year pastorate from 1965-74.
Those were years of turmoil with civil rights and the Vietnam War, and locally
a total of four murders. The church gained an office, raised money for three
Sunday School rooms and installed a new electric organ. Social action became an
increasing theme at church meetings.

It was during the pastorate of Rev. Ken Fuller (1975-79) that what many think
of as the “town clock” was installed in the church steeple. The funds had
originally been raised in the early 1920’s by holding two successful minstrel
shows. The money was set aside and finally a clock was set in place June 11,
1976.

During the 1980’s the church struggled with what to do about a deteriorating
parsonage, eventually deciding to keep and upgrade it. Funds were raised, work
and materials donated, and the result was what the trustees proudly called “a
transformation from a costly liability into a pleasantly renovated and economic
residence for our pastor.”

Moving into the parsonage in the fall of 1983, was the Rev. John Pinder, who
has the distinction of serving the church’s longest pastorate of the 20th
century (1983-93). Rev. Pinder, who was active in the community and
instrumental in founding Rochester Community Care, which became the Park House,
was followed by the church’s first husband and wife pastorate team, the Revs.
Mark and Judy Kennedy.

The church’s present pastor, Rev. Bill Daniels, who arrived just a year ago,
has been working with Mary Davis of the Rochester Historical Society on a
church history book (which will be published later this fall) with assistance
from Eileen Daniels and church historian Royce Gage. During their research for
the book, they were fascinated by the many old letters and other documents,
some dating from the latter part of the 1700’s, that were found in the church
records.

At the dedication of the new church almost a half century ago, it was noted
that “when you build a church, you never stop; you keep on building.” As the
Federated Church heads into its third century, the members will be keeping that
in mind.

By Martha Slater

* * * * * * * * * *

Windsor County was formed 1781 from Woodstock County.

ROOTSWEB gives this background on Rochester:

The town of Rochester was brought into existence by an act of the Vermont
legislature passed on November 6, 1780. In August of 1780 and again in October
the Indians attacked the towns of Barnard and Roylaton. These two events put
off the settlement of Rochester until 1781 when John Sanger, Joel Cooper,
Timothy Clements, James Guggin and John Emerson came to the town. In 1782
Daniel Emerson and David Currier settled in town. Davids’ twin sons, Frederick
and William, were the first born children in the town of Rochester. In 1786 and
1787 Enoch Emerson built the first saw and grist-mills in town and Ebenezer
Burnham donated four acres to build a meeting-house, church-yard and commom. In
1790 Dr. Retire Trask, the first physician, came to town. In 1793 Ebenezer
Morse , the first blacksmith, also settled in Rochester. The first town meeting
took place on May 15, 1788 at the house of Ebenezer Burnham. Lt. David Currier
was chosen twon clerk; Capt. Timothy Clements, selectman; Timothy Clements,
Enoch Emerson and Aaron Wilbur, highway surveyors; Moses Currier, constable;
and Joseph Boice, collector.
Prominent families of Rochester: Truman D. Austin, Thomas Bailey, Henry
Chaffee, Major-General Artemas Cushman, Benjamin F. Hubbard, Dr. Daniel
Huntington, Fayette A. Keezer, Messer Family, Chester and Rev. Daniel Sparhawk,
Gideon W. Angell, Oren L. Beckwith, Emerson Family, Hubbard Family, La Roy
Martin, Calvin Morse, Francis T. Mosher, Robinson Family, Wyman Family.

++++++

The Sparhawk genealogy was supplied to Dorothy McClure by Mr. Howard Sparhawk
of Billings, Montana. Compiled by Cecil Hampden Cutts Edward.

* * * * * * * * *

Sparhawk Journals Return Home

Over two centuries after they were written in the neat and elaborate script of
the day, the journals of Ebenezer Sparhawk Jr. have been returned to Rochester
by one of his descendents.

The journals, which were handed down through Sparhawk’s family, first came to
the attention of the Rochester Town History Committee 38 years ago, in 1966,
when a letter of inquiry came to the town postmaster. That led the committee to
have access to material from the journals and thus, the Rochester Town History
book, published in 1975, included many interesting entries from those
journals.

The owner of the journals at that time was Albert McClure, a descendent of
Ebenezer Jr. Albert’s wife, Dorothy McClure, transcribed many of them and Jane
Sparhawk, another relative, typed up the transcriptions.

Dorothy valued the journals greatly and thought they should be returned to
Rochester after her death. After celebrating her 100th birthday this past
October, she developed pneumonia and died Dec. 8, 2003. Her daughter, Betty
Kirby, sent the journals to the Rochester Historical Society, causing great
excitement among its members.

“What a treasure!” said Mary Davis. “We are so grateful to have them.”

Sparhawk History

The journals, which span the years 1789-1822, are about 3 1/2 inches by six
inches, made of folded paper hand-sewn with thread. They are brown with age and
very fragile.

Davis explained that Ebenezer’s father, Ebenezer Sparhawk Sr., was one of the
signers of the charter issued for the town July 30, 1781. His intention was to
provide land for his sons, Ebenezer Jr. and Henry.

Born May 28, 1764 in Templeton, Mass., Ebenezer Jr. was a teacher, surveyor,
carpenter and farmer. A prominent citizen, he was active in church, school, and
town affairs. According to his journal, 20 year-old Ebenezer Jr. first arrived
in Rochester in the fall of 1784 to view his father’s land.

This was at a time when traveling in the area wasn’t easy. For example, there
was only a bridle path through the woods from Royalton to Rochester. North of
Rochester, and through to Warren and Waitsfield, the only guide for a traveler
was a series of marked trees. However, for the next five years, Ebenezer Jr.
traveled back and forth frequently between Templeton, Mass. and Rochester,
working his own land and working for others. Finally, in October of 1789, he
began framing his house and became a Vermont resident.

It wasn’t until almost 10 years later, on June 23, 1799, when he was 35, that
Ebenezer Jr. married. His bride’s name was Azuba Jefferson. Their first child,
George, was born in May 1800, followed by a second son, Samuel, in 1802, and
three daughters: Priscilla, born in 1803, Polly in 1805, and Naomi in 1807. A
third son, Ebenezer III, arrived in 1809, and a fourth, Joseph, (who died at
the age of two) in 1811. Two more daughters, Martha, born in 1814, and Louisa,
born in 1816, also joined the family.

Ebenezer Jr. died Oct. 31, 1836, at the age of 72. His widow, Azuba, died in
1847 at the age of 68.

Sparhawk’s diaries provide a fascinating look at the everyday activities and
special occasions in the early days of a rural Vermont town. They cover births,
deaths, marriages, and other family news; farming issues, the building of
houses, his work as a surveyor, the weather, the establishment of stage routes,
churches and town organizations; trips out of town, business deals, local court
cases, state news, the War of 1812, and various milestones for the town.

Historical Society

The Rochester Historical Society Museum, located on the second floor of the
Rochester Public Library building, is closed during the winter months, but will
have a number of the journals on display when it re-opens June 1.

The historical society members are currently working on plans for their display
at the Vermont History Expo at the Tunbridge fairgrounds June 26 and 27. Their
subject this year is “Wash Day Circa 1900,” and anyone who has artifacts,
photos, etc. they would be willing to share, is urged to contact Mary Davis at
767-4759. New members are always welcome.

By Martha Slater


Sources

1. Cecil Hampden Cutts Howard, “Materials for a Genealogy of the Sparhawk
Family in New England”, compiled by Cecil Hampden Cutts Howard.
2. Internet search.
3. Vermont, Windsor County, 1800 U.S. Population Schedule – Vermont, Windsor
County (Images at Ancestry.com).
4. Vermont, Windsor County, 1810 U.S. Population Schedule- Vermont, Windsor
County (Images at Ancestry.com).
5. Vermont, Windsor County, 1820 U.S. Census – Vermont, Windsor County (Images
at Ancestry.com).
6. GenForum.
7. Vermont, Franklin County, 1850 U.S. Population Schedule (Images at
Ancestry.com).
8. Agnes Crockett’s family genealogy.

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