Bio of Frank L. Yale, Pioneer Citizen of Liberal, Missouri

Frank Yale was a free-thinking, materialist, pioneer citizen of Liberal, Missouri, and is mentioned throughout literature on its early members, but one wouldn’t guess this from his bio of 1912.

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A HISTORY OF JASPER COUNTY, MISSOURI AND ITS PEOPLE
VOLUME 2
by Joel Thomas Livingston
1912

FRANK L. YALE — A representative business man and highly esteemed citizen of Joplin is Frank L. Yale, who has had the happiness of his heightened and successful activities in the mining, real estate and insurance business. Upon occasion he has given excellent service in public office and he is entitled to additional distinction as a veteran of the Civil war, his services in the great conflict of fifty years ago having been of the most gallant and active sort.

Mr. Yale was born April 14, 1848, in Lynn township, Knox county, Illinois, both of his parents, Gad Lowery and Abbey (Reed) Yale, having been natives of the state of Connecticut. They removed from the Nutmeg state when young people, the father, who was a farmer, dying in Illinois. The boyhood days of Mr. Yale were passed in Illinois and they were shadowed in some degree by the approach and outbreak of the Civil war. But thirteen years of age at the time the first guns were fired upon Fort Sumter, the impatience of the high-spirited young boy to take part in the struggle and to give his support to the cause with which he was in sympathy increased with the passing of the months, and in March, 1864, he enlisted in Company G, of the One Hundred and Twelfth Illinois Infantry, and served until August 13, 1865, when he was mustered out. In this time he was plunged into the thickest of the conflict, seeing much fighting and covering much territory, but he never missed a day’s service. He was with Sherman on the march from Chattanooga to Atlanta and thence to Nashville, during that time serving with Schofield corps.

Upon the termination of the war and the return to civilian life Mr. Yale south congenial occupation and having gone to Barton county, Missouri, there taught school for several years and subsequently served as county surveyor. The momentous step of his removal to Joplin was in 1889 and his career here has been of a character to amply justify the step. Prosperity and consideration have come to him as the logical outcome of character and attainments, while he has always taken an active interest in public affairs and every moment for the welfare of Joplin has found in him a staunch supporter.

Glancing at Mr. Yale’s service in a public capacity we find that previous to his coming here, while a resident of Barton county, Missouri, he acted for some time in the important capacity of county surveyor, and since coming to this city he has received signal mark of public favor by being made a member of the Joplin City Council. At the time of the World’s Fair in Chicago he was appointed a member of the Missouri board by Governor Stone and was made chairman by that body, a move particularly appropriate on account of his familiarity with the industry and his high standing as a citizen. For years he has been an active and valued member of the Commercial Club and at the present time holds the office of president, and many excellent movements looking toward civic betterment have been born of his initiative.

In August, 1868, Mr. Yale was united in marriage to Miss Zerilda A. Tobler, daughter of Mr. Tobler of Newton county, Missouri. The life of this admirable lady met an early termination Mary 22, 1873. The three daughters of this marriage are Luella, now Mrs. S. H. Montgomery of Belle Plaine, Iowa; Maria, now Mrs. J. W. Williams, of Omaha, Nebraska; and Cora B., wife of P. W. Inger of Joplin. On July 4, 1876, Mr. Yale was again married, Miss Rachel Mann, daughter of B. F. Mann, becoming his wife and the mistress of his household. Their two children are Luna O., now Mrs. C. M. Marks of Los Angeles, California; and Walter O., who is in the service of the Burlington Railroad at Omaha.

Mr. Yale is liberal in his views, both political and religious, and accords to every man the right to think and act for himself. He is a popular and highly respected gentleman, who has always given his best and most whole-hearted efforts towards the welfare of the community and the advancement and prosperity of Joplin.

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