atwellhiramorig

Hiram Atwell and Rachel Scagel

atwellhiramorig

Hiram Atwell original

HiramAtwell_p

Hiram Atwell adjusted

atwellhiramportrait

Hiram Atwell portrait

Hiram’s wife Rachel died in childbirth, the baby Francis dying a few days later. An older child, Hiram, took some medicine intended for his mother, and this caused his death later. Hiram kept the home together for his young daughters. When the gold rush started in California in 1849, he decide to go. He sold all his stock except for some younger animals that he was going to take to his father’s home in Johnson, VT, about fifteen mines away. It was a warm, sunny morning when he started to drive the calves down the road to his father’s home. Along in the forenoon it became very cold so he stopped at a house and procured an overcoat to keep him warm. The storm grew worse and the next morning, when he did not appear at his father’s house, they started to search
for him. He was found frozen to death with the calves all huddled around him.

SOURCE: Taken from family bible of Ray Noyes in 1918. Written by Pansy Noyes Bryant, granddaughter.

Hiram ATWELL was born 2 March 1801, in Johnson, Lamoille Co., VT, to Nathaniel
ATWELL and Lydia HUNKINS
.

On 7 Oct. 1830, at Waterbury Center, Washington Co. VT., Hiram married Rachel SCAGEL.

Rachel was born 15 April 1802, at Waterbury Center, Washington Co. VT., to
George SCHAGEL and Sarah or Sally PIERCE.

According to the family record of Caroline Atwell Noyes, daughter of Hiram and Rachel, Hiram died 2 Dec. 1849 at Waterbury Center, Washington Co. VT., and Rachel died 17 April 1843 at Waterbury Center, Washington Co. VT.

The family history gives Rachel dying in childbirth when Caroline was 8, and her baby brother, Francis, died a few days later. An older child, Hiram, took some medicine intended for his mother and died. Her father froze to death when Caroline was 14, and she was sent to New Berlin, WI to be raised by an aunt. Here she met James Allen NOYES whom she married in 1859. She always told her
children she was a cousin of President Franklin PIERCE.

According to family record, Hiram and Rachel had the following children:

1) Hiram Scagel Atwell, born May 05, 1832 in Waterbury Center, Vermont; died July 23, 1834 in Waterbury Center, Vermont.
2) Sarah Ann Lydia Atwell, born April 18, 1834 in Waterbury Center, Vermont; died January 03, 1877 in Boston, Massachusetts; married Norman West Gilbert March 07, 1852 in Waterbury, Massachusetts.
2) Caroline b. 2 Oct. 1835 at Waterbury, Washington Co. VT., married James
Allen NOYES
.
3) Francis Atwell, born April 11, 1843 in Waterbury Center, Vermont; died April
20, 1843 in Waterbury Center, Vermont.

Included in the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses were questions regarding those who died in the twelve months prior to the enumeration. They list persons who died between 1 June and 31 May of the year prior to the census.The AIS Mortality Schedule from 1850 gives the following:

1850 ATWILL HIRAM WASHINGTON CO. VT 48 M DEC VT FARMER MRT197

Hiram ATWELL, however, appears in the 1850 Vermont Washington Co. Census
(recorded 28 August 1850) on page 298 in household 1869/1879:

Hiram ATWELL 48 farmer $2000
Metilda 44
Sarah A. 16
John 14
Caroline 12
Mary 9

There is no other Hiram ATWELL in the census index for the years 1830 to 1850. Also, this Hiram is living beside the Orson BRYAN family, Sarah Sally SCAGEL, a sister of Rachel, being Orson BRYAN’s wife. Another SCAGGEL in the census is on page 297A, which is Thomas SCAGGELL, a brother of Rachel’s mother. The fact this Hiram is living beside Sarah Sally SCAGEL fairly cements it that he is Caroline’s father.

The “year” being recorded was from 2 June 1849 to June 1 1850, so that is why Hiram appears, his death on 2 Dec 1849 falling midway. The date the recording was made was thus August 1849 though for the 1850 census.

Caroline Atwell’s family death record further gives “Hiram Atwell died Dec. 2 1849 at 9 oclock P.M. aged 48 years.”

It is difficult to reconcile this story of his being caught in a blizzard and freezing to death with Caroline giving the exact time of his death unless she was guessing an approximate time, or the physician guessed an approximate time. No other individual does she give a time of death for, only the day. I’m not saying I doubt the story that he froze to death, but because of her giving the time I wonder if he might have been found alive, then died.

Another seeming inconsistency is Hiram’s father, Nathan, had died in 1844 and his mother in 1848, so he would not have been going to his father. Perhaps what had been his father’s home, yes, if a sibling was living there. His brothers James, John and Benjamin all resided in Johnson and he may have been going to see them.

Though this may not be the case, it appears that Hiram may have remarried after Rachel’s death. Matilda is found in the 1880 census in her brother’s household as a Matilda ATWELL, widowed. If Matilda was the widow of another unknown ATWELL who had come to help Hiram, usually the census taker would list such a person at the end of the household instead of beneath Hiram.

So, is Mary born c. 1841, an unrecorded full sister or step-sister to Caroline? If Matilda had brought children in from a previous marriage then it would seem those children would be listed under their father’s surname, though this didn’t always happen.

John, it seems, is not a child of Metilda, for there is a male in the 1840 Hiram ATWELL household who does not appear in Caroline’s record.

The 1840 Washington County VT Waterbury Census has the following for Hiram’s household: 1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram), 2 females 5 to 10 (would be likely Caroline and Sarah as no female under 5 is given), 1 female 10 to 15 (would be ?), and a female 30 to 40 (Rachel).

We have not only a male (perhaps John) who is in the 1840 census and does not appear in Caroline’s record, we also have a female who was aged 10 to 15 in 1840. Is it possible she is an unrecorded sister?

There is no explanation for why Caroline gave no record of her father marrying a second time before his death, nor is there explanation for why she did not record this John who may be a brother, and perhaps another older sister. I doubt that John would have been a child of Metilda’s for, as noted, an unamed male occurs in the 1840 census who is most likely this Jolhn, and if he was a child from a previous marriage of Metilda’s it seems he would be given by his father’s name. And if Metilda was an Atwell relation, a sister-in-law, it seems she would have been listed after the natural children, rather than next to Hiram, as was usually the case with relatives living in a household.

As a personal aside, I recollect my grandmother Dorothy telling me the story of this family. Because it was so tragic, it made an imprint and I always remembered her telling of it including a young son who had frozen to death with Hiram, and John could be that son. Dorothy could have been wrong in her telling, but I know my memory serves me correctly at least on what she related because it seemed exceptionally tragic that both the father and son would freeze to death at the same time and, as mentioned, made quite an imprint. With the telling of the story, Dorothy also had brought out a photo she believed to be of the family, though she was not absolutely certain. I know that I don’t recollect the photo as being any of the Noyes photos that I’ve since seen.


Husband: Hiram + Atwell (1)


Born: 1801 Mar 2 – Johnson, Lamoille, Vermont (2)
Christened:
Died: 1849 Dec 2-1850 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA
(3)
Buried: – Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center, Washington,
Vermont, USA (4)
Father: Nathaniel “Nathan” + Atwell (1766-1844) (5)
Mother: Lydia + Hunkins (1772-1846) (6)
Marriage: 1830 Oct 7 Place: Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA (7)


Other Spouse: Matilda Smith (1805- ) (8) Date: After 1843


Events


1. Birth: 1801 Mar 2 Johnson, Lamoille, Vermont.

2. Photo: Hiram Atwell, Bef 1850, Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (9)

Image courtesy of Nancy Benton.

3. Census: 1810 Place Yet To Be Located.. Unless an error was made in
the census, neither Hiram nor his brother Benjamin appear in their
parents’ household.

The census shows:

Nathan ATWELL 1 male 10 thru 15, 1 male 30 to 44, 3 females under 10, 2
females 10 thru 15, 1 female 30 to 44
John or William apparently are given, but not Benjamin or Hiram who were
both under 10. It shows Lydia, Phoebe and Olive who were all under 10,
and Bridget and Susan who were over 10. So where are Benjamin and
Hiram?

4. Census: Pg. 172 1820 Johnson, Franklin, Vermont. (10)

Roll: M33_127
Page: 172
Image: 185
Nathan ATWELL 3 – 1 4 – 1 1 2 3 – 1 – 3
COMMENT: 3 males under 10 b. 1810 to 1820, 1 male between 16 and 18 b.
1802 to 1804, 4 males of 16 and under 26 including heads of families b.
c. 1794 to 1804, 1 male 45 and up born c. 1774 and over. 1 female under
10 b. 1810 to 1820, 2 females 10 and under 16 b. 1804 to 1810, 3 females
of 16 and under 26 b. 1794 to 1804, 1 female 45 and up born 1774 and
over.

The 3 males under 10 are Asher, James and Nathan. The male between 16
and 18 is Benjamin, guess the 4 males of 16 and under 26 are John,
William, Hiram and Benjamin, then there’s Nathan. The female under 10 is
Caroline. The 2 females 10 and under 16 are Olive and Phoebe. The 3
females 16 and under 26 would be Bridget, Susan and Lydia, and then there
is Lydia.

5. Matrimony 1: 1830 Oct 7, Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA.
(7) Married to Rachel SCAGEL at the age of 29. She was 28.

6. Residence: Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (11)

7. Census: 1830 Place Yet To Be Located..
Hiram ATWELL has yet to be located in the 1830 census. Rachel’s father’s
household seems to show multiple households in 1830 and as Hiram and
Rachel were just married it is possible thatye were staying with the
Scagels.

8. Child’s Birth: Caroline is born., 1835 Oct 2. She will marry James
Allen NOYES. DIRECT LINE

9. Census: 1840 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (12)

Roll:
M704_546, Image 292, Page 357
Hiram ATWELL – 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – / – 2 1 – –
1

1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely?, Hiram Jr. being
already dead), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram); 2 females 5 to 10 (would be
Sarah and Caroline), 1 female 10 to 15 would be ?, and a female 30 to
40.

10. Matrimony 2: Possible remarriage. Not confirmed., After 1843.
Hiram may have possibly married a Metilda (SMITH) after 1843.

11. Census: pg. 298 1850 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (8)

Recorded 28 August 1850
6 1869/1879 Hiram ATWELL 48 m farmer $2000 b. VT
7 Metilda 44 f b. VT
8 Sarah A. 16 f attended school b. VT
9 John 14 m attended school b. VT
10 Caroline 12 f attended school b. VT
11 Mary 9 f attended school b. VT

12 1870 1880 Sarah BRYAN 55 f $10,000 b. MA
13 Lorna 26 f b. VT
14 Mary 16 f attended school b. VT
15 John 11 m attended school b. VT
16 George S. 26 m Farmer Married within the year b. VT
17 Milissa A 21 f married within the year b. VT

Sarah Sally SCAGEL, a sister of Rachel, who married Orson BRYAN, is
living next door. Another SCAGGEL in the census is on page 297A, which
is Thomas SCAGGELL, a brother of Rachel’s mother.

The “year” being recorded was from 2 June 1849 to June 1 1850, so that is
why Hiram appears, his death on 2 Dec 1849 falling midway. The date the
recording was made was thus August 1849 though for the 1850 census.

12. AIS Mortality Schedule: 1850.
1850 ATWILL HIRAM WASHINGTON CO. VT 48 M DEC VT FARMER MRT197

On the AIS: Included in the 1850, 1860, 1870, and 1880 censuses were
questions regarding those who died in the twelve months prior to the
enumeration. They list persons who died between 1 June and 31 May of the
year prior to the census.

13. Death: 1849 Dec 2 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (13)

Caroline Atwell’s record gives “Hiram Atwell died Dec. 2 1849 at 9 oclock
P.M. aged 48 years.”

The history states Hiram was caught in a blizzard and was found the next
morning frozen to death. It is difficult to reconcile this story with
Caroline giving the exact time of his death unless she was guessing an
approximate time, or the physician guessed an approximate time. No other
individual does she give a time of death for, only the day. I’m not
saying I doubt the story that he froze to death, but because of her
giving the time I wonder if he might have been found alive, then died.

14. Cause of death: Froze to death in sudden storm., 1849 Dec 2,
Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (14)


“Hiram Atwell, after his wife died in 1843, kept the home together for
his young daughters. When the gold rush started in California in 1849, he
decided to go. He sold off his stock, all except some younger animals
that he was going to take to his father’s home in Johnson VT, about
fifteen miles away. It was a warm sunny morning when he started to drive
those calves down the road to his father’s. Along in the forenoon it
became very cold so Hiram stopped at a house and procured an overcoat to
keep him warm. The storm grew worse and the next morning when he did not
appear at his father’s house, they started in search of him. He was found
frozen to death with the calves all huddled around him.”

COMMENT: Hiram’s father had died in 1844 and his mother in 1848, so he
would not have been going to his father. Perhaps what had been his
father’s home, yes, if a sibling was living there. His brothers James,
John and Benjamin all resided in Johnson.

15. Cemetery: ? Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA. (15)
Buried at the Old Waterbury Center Cemetery at Waterbury, Washington Co.
VT.

Hiram Atwell d Dec 2,1849, AE 48 yrs 8 mos
Rachel Scagel, his wife, d Apr 17, 1843, AE 41 yrs
Francis Atwell, their son, d Apr 20, 1843, AE 10 days
Hiram Atwell, their son, d July 23, 1834, AE 1 yr, 8 mo 18 days

16. Accessory Document: Family Birth Record Nathan and Lydia Atwell, 1885
Mar 1. (2)

Recorded March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying
of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

17. Accessory Document: Marriages of the Children of Nathan and Lydia
Atwell, Cir 1885. (7)
Recorded probably March 1
of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell
family bible 17 Feb of 1883.

18. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Record, Cir 1885. (16)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from
Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

19. Accessory Document: Hiram Awell Family Death Record, Cir 1885. (13)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell
from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

20. Accessory Document: Deaths of the Family of Nathan and Lydia Atwell,
1885 Mar 1. (3)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by
Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17
Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

21. Accessory Document: Caroline Atwell History by Pansy Noyes Bryant.
(14)

22. Photo: Unidentified Atwell photos, Northfield, Washington, Vermont,
USA. (17)

The images of E. D. SCAGEL and his wife are 2-1/4 X 3-3/4
cartes-de-vistes images which have revenue stamps on the back indiciating
they were taken between 1864 and 1866. The tax stamps were required
during the period 1 August 1864 to 1 August 1866. They were taken at the
studio of S. O. Hersey in Montpelier, Vermont.

Olive Atwell FISK, sister of Hiram ATWELL, was living in Montpelier in
1880. It was in Montpelier that Sarah Atwell GILBERT, Hiram’s daughter,
was buried in 1877. Emery SCAGEL and his wife had their photos taken in
Montpeleir at the S. O. Hersey studio circa 1864-1866.

24. Photo: Unidentified woman, possibly an Atwell. (19)
Image courtesy of Nancy Benton.

25. Edit : 2003 Oct.


Wife: Rachel + Scagel (20)


Born: 1802 Apr 15 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA (16)
Christened:
Died: 1843 Apr 17 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA (13)
Buried: – Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center, Washington,
Vermont, USA (21)
Father: George + Scagel (1765-1852) (22)
Mother: Sarah Or Sally (+) Pierce (1767-1848) (23)


Events


1. Birth: 1802 Apr 15 , , Vermont. (16) She is given as born in VT,
Washington Co., Waterbury Center. Washington Co. didn’t exist in 1802.
She was born in what apparently eventually became Washington Co.,
Waterbury Center.

2. Census: 1810 Waterbury, Caledonia, Vermont, USA. (24)

pg. 173
Stephen GONES
Thomas GUTTUIL?
Isaac GUTTUIL?
James BRYANT
George SCHAGEL (looks like SCHAZEL) 3 2 – 1 / 1 1 –
1 1

John FISK
Hiram PEEK
Wm. COTTON

COMMENT: 3 males under 10 would be Thomas, Lorenzo and perhaps Francis.
The 2 males 10 to 15 would be George and Hiram. The male 26 to 44 would
be George. The female under 10 would be Rachel. The female 10 to 15
would be perhaps Sarah. The female 25 to 44 would be Sarah. The female
over 45 wouldn’t be Rachel Lee SCAGEL as Jacob died in 1817. Perhaps she
is Sarah’s mother.

3. Census: Pg. 19 1820 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (25)

Pg. 19, Roll M33_128, Image 31
1820 VT, Washington Co. Waterbury
Lemuel LYON
Cheser MARSHALL
? LYON
Stephen JONES
Robert JOHNSON
Geroge SEAGUEL – 2 – 1 1 – / 1 – 1 1 1 –
George SEAGUEL Jr. – – – 1 – – / 1 – 1 – – –
Osa POLOROD? Jr.
Benjamin FISK
John FISK

In the elder George’s house, 2 males 10 to 16, 1 male 16 to 26, 1 male 26
to 45, 1 female under 10, 1 2 females 16 to 26, 1 female 26 to 45, 1 45
and up.

The 2 males 10 to 16 are Lorenzo and Thomas, the 1 male 16 to 26 is
unknown (George living in the next household), the 26 to 45 male is
perhaps George placed in the wrong column except that there is also a 26
to 45 year old female in the household who could be the wife of this male
(there is no male listed 45 and over); the female under 10 is unknown,
the two females 15 to 26 would be Rachel and Sarah, the female 26 to 45
is unknown, the female over 45 would be Sarah.

In the younger George’s house, 1 male 16 to 26, 1 female under 10, 1
female 16 to 26

4. Marriage: Rachel marries Hiram ATWELL., 1830 Oct 7, Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA. (7)

5. Census: 1830 Place Yet To Be Located..
Hiram ATWELL has yet to be located in the 1830 census. Rachel’s father’s
household seems to show multiple households in 1830 and as Hiram and
Rachel were just married it is possible thatye were staying with the
Scagels.

6. Child’s Birth: Caroline is born., 1835 Oct 2. She will marry James
Allen NOYES. DIRECT LINE

7. Census: Pg. 357 1840 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (12)

Roll: M704_546, Image 292, Page 357
Hiram ATWELL – 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – / – 2 1 – –
1

1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely?, Hiram Jr. being
already dead), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram); 2 females 5 to 10 (would be
Sarah and Caroline), 1 female 10 to 15 would be ?, and a female 30 to
40.

8. Death: 1843 Apr 17 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (13)

Rachel is given in the family history as dying in childbirth. She
appears to have died as a result of childbirth but it was not until 6
days after her son Francis was born.

Rachel died a day before daughter Sarah’s 8th birthday, Francis dying
three days thereafter on the 20th.

9. Cemetery: ? Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA. (15)
Buried at the Old Waterbury Center Cemetery at Waterbury, Washington Co.
VT.

Hiram Atwell d Dec 2,1849, AE 48 yrs 8 mos
Rachel Scagel, his wife, d Apr 17, 1843, AE 41 yrs
Francis Atwell, their son, d Apr 20, 1843, AE 10 days
Hiram Atwell, their son, d July 23, 1834, AE 1 yr, 8 mo 18 days

10. Accessory Document: Marriages of the Children of Nathan and Lydia
Atwell, Cir 1885. (7)
Recorded probably March 1
of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell
family bible 17 Feb of 1883.

11. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Record, Cir 1885. (16)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from
Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

12. Accessory Document: Hiram Awell Family Death Record, Cir 1885. (13)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by
Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17
Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

13. Accessory Document: Caroline Atwell History by Pansy Noyes Bryant.
(14)

14. Edit : 2003 Oct.


Children


1 F Unknown Female Atwell (26)
Born: Cir 1825-1830
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Possible Child: Possible unrecorded child of Hiram and Rachel Atwell.

In the 1840 census, an unknown female age 10 to 15 is in the household.
She is not in the 1850 census but she would have been of age to have been
married. As there was also a male in the household that Caroline didn’t
count and appears to be the John b. c. 1836 in the 1850 census, perhaps
these two are siblings not given in her accounting of family, though it
could be this female was a relative.

2. Census: 1840 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (12)
An unknown female occurs in the 1840 census in Hiram’s household, aged 10
to 15 which would place her birth between 1830 and 1825. She may be a
daughter or a relative.

Roll: M704_546, Image 292, Page 357
Hiram ATWELL – 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – / – 2 1 – –
1

1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely?, Hiram Jr. being
already dead), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram); 2 females 5 to 10 (would be
Sarah and Caroline), 1 female 10 to 15 would be ?, and a female 30 to
40.

3. Edit : 2003 Oct.


2 M Hiram Scagel Atwell (16)
Born: 1832 May 5 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA
Christened:
Died: 1834 Jul 23 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA (13)
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Birth: 1832 Nov 5 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (16)
From Caroline Atwell Noye’s record. She does not provide birth place.

2. Name: Hiram is a namesake of his father and his mother’s maiden name.

3. Death: 1834 Jul 23 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (13)

Caroline states “Hiram son of Hiram and Rachel Atwell died July 23, 1834
Age 1 year 8 months 18 days”. He actually died at 2 years, 2 months and
18 days according to the birth and death dates that she gives. According
to this death date, for him to have died at 2 years, 2 months and 18 days
his birth date would then be 5 Nov 1832.

4. Cemetery: ? Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA. (15)
Buried at the Old Waterbury Center Cemetery at Waterbury, Washington Co.
VT.

Hiram Atwell d Dec 2,1849, AE 48 yrs 8 mos
Rachel Scagel, his wife, d Apr 17, 1843, AE 41 yrs
Francis Atwell, their son, d Apr 20, 1843, AE 10 days
Hiram Atwell, their son, d July 23, 1834, AE 1 yr, 8 mo 18 days

5. Accessory Document: Hiram Awell Family Death Record, Cir 1885. (13) Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by
Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17
Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

6. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Record, Cir 1885. (16)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from
Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

7. Accessory Document: Caroline Atwell History by Pansy Noyes Bryant.
(14)


3 F Sarah Ann Lydia Atwell (16)
Born: 1834 Apr 18 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA
Christened:
Died: 1877 Jan 3 – Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts (13)
Buried: 1877 Jan 5 – Northfield, Washington, Vermont, USA
Spouse: Norman West Gilbert (Cir 1830- ) (27)
Marr. Date: 1852 Mar 7 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA (28)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Birth: 1834 Apr 18 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (16)

From Caroline Atwell Noyes’ record. She does not however supply birth
place.

2. Name: Sarah Ann Lydia would appear to be a namesake for her paternal
and maternal grandmothers.

3. Photo: Sarah Atwell Gilbert, c. late 1850’s to early 1860’s. (29)

Sarah, in the photo, is wearing a dress with pagoda sleeves. Joan Nunn’s
“Fashion in Costume” states, The tendency for the sleeve to widen
below the elbow in the 1850s led to the pagoda sleeve, seamed on the
inner side and cut to expand widely at the elbow, caught up at the bend
of the arm and falling almost to the wrist at the outer edge. During the
late 1850s it was slit open almost the whole length in front, hanging
away at the back like an oversleeve and worn with detachable white
undersleeves edged with lace or embroidery, sometimes with a matching
chemisette.
However, the dress shows what is said to be a higher
rounded waistline which would become fashionable in the 1860s. Pagoda
sleeves fell out of fashion during the early 1860s but are said to have
been worn by a lesser extent by the general public. The sleeve is dropped
at the shoulder as it was in the era to give the impression of a smaller
waist. The bodice is tight with the closure in the front. In the late
1850s skirts began to change from a dome to a bell shape, top hoops of
crinoline frames reduced in diameter and the skirt gored so it flowed
from the tiny waist to the wide hemline, as is Sarah’s here.

A common hairstyle is the hair parted in the middle, pulled back, with
soft curls here at the sides. She may wear a bow in her hair.

A drape with no painted backdrop is given as typical of this era of
photography. Her hand rests on a Victorian chair.

4. Census: Pg. 357 1840 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (12)

Roll: M704_546, Image 292, Page 357
Hiram ATWELL – 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – / – 2 1 – –
1

1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely?, Hiram Jr. being
already dead), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram); 2 females 5 to 10 (would be
Sarah and Caroline), 1 female 10 to 15 would be ?, and a female 30 to
40.

5. Census: Sheet 297A 1850 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA.
(8)

Recorded 28 August 1850
6 1869/1879 Hiram ATWELL 48 m farmer $2000 b. VT
7 Metilda 44 f b. VT
8 Sarah A. 16 f attended school b. VT
9 John 14 m attended school b. VT
10 Caroline 12 f attended school b. VT
11 Mary 9 f attended school b. VT

12 1870 1880 Sarah BRYAN 55 f $10,000 b. MA
13 Lorna 26 f b. VT
14 Mary 16 f attended school b. VT
15 John 11 m attended school b. VT
16 George S. 26 m Farmer Married within the year b. VT
17 Milissa A 21 f married within the year b. VT

Sarah Sally SCAGEL, a sister of Rachel, who married Orson BRYAN, is
living next door. Another SCAGGEL in the census is on page 297A, which
is Thomas SCAGGELL, a brother of Rachel’s mother.

The “year” being recorded was from 2 June 1849 to June 1 1850, so that is
why Hiram appears, his death on 2 Dec 1849 falling midway. The date the
recording was made was thus August 1849 though for the 1850 census.

6. Marriage: Married N. West GILBERT., 1852 Mar 7, Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA. (28) Given as marrying in Waterbury MA by Nancy
Benton but I don’t believe there is a Waterbury MA. This is likely
instead Waterbury, VT. She was 18 years of age.

7. Census: 1860 Place Yet To Be Located..

8. Census: 1870 Montpelier, Washington, Vermont. (30)

6th of June. Page 161 (Image 11 at Ancestry.com)
3 41/42 BROWN Isaac W. 56 mw Manufacturer $8000
$10,000 b. VT
4 Carrie 39 fw Keeping house b. VT
5 GILBERT Norman W. 40 mw Dentist $2500 $2500 b. VT
6 Sarah 36 fw b. VT

7 -14 42/43 BROOKS Nathaniel P. and Mary household.

9. Business Circular: Advertising for shop of L. S. FISH and S. A.
GILBERT, 1873 Apr 10, Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts. (31)

New Firm! New Goods!
April 10th 1873
We respectfully invite your attention to our
LITTLE STORE
No. 417 SHAWMUT AVENUE
Out stock comprises a full line of
MILLINERY GOODS
and having had a large experience in the business
we hope to give perfect satisfaction to
who may favor us with their patronage.
Orders completed at short notice, in the
most fashionable and becoming styles.
LADIES’ DRESS CAPS.
All styles, constantly on hand, and made to
order. We shall also keep an assortment of
Cambric, Silesia, Crinoline,
Dress Braids, Sewing Silk, Thread and
SMALL WARES.
L.S. FISH
S. A. GILBERT

10. Business: Millinery shop.

11. Correspondence: Letter from Sarah to Caroline, 1876 Nov 21. (32)

417 Shawmut Ave.

My dear Sister

It has been a long time since I have written you still I have not
forgotten you I think of you every day and wonder when I am to see you
again I hope you & Viola are back to health and the rest of the family
well – I am much better than in the summer. West is not very well – his
partner was sick for near three months this summer & it was very hard for
him. He is talking of selling out again although no one knows it here and
if he does he will take a long rest perhaps go out west – if he was not
so miserable I should feel terribly about it – he has done very well
since he went back into the office and

(2)

if I could feel sure that he was going to be able to work for two years
to come I should feel terrible but I don’t want him to work on the
(unintelligible) when he is not able to be we are fated to be unsettled
all the time if he does go out of business I shall try to get out of the
store by the way how many (unintelligible) has been & is there a chance
for another some time when you are in town wish you would work not the
(unintelligible) but some good responsible person that would know what
the chances would be there for the spring trade – I can’t sell to Mrs.
Fill (?) because she has not go any thing to buy with and I may be
obliged to take the goods somewhere to set them up and perhaps
(unintellible) & then sell out – I can’t tell what I shall do would go to
(unintelligible) I could hear of where there was a good chance – there
are many things I like about being in a store

(3)

but if West is going to be miserable (unintelligible) go to be here – I
don’t get home until after he is in bed almost every night – I have had
so much (unintelligible) for the last year that I shalt like to be
relieved of some of it – for a while – business is at a stand still here
as well as at other places – don’t expect much until the Election is
settled (unintellible) probably here more (unintelligible) for you are in
a democratic (?) district I believe – West went to VT this summer went to
(unintelligible) at Waterbury took (unintelligible) with (?) is not there
any more she died the last of July with softening of the brain (…) and
that it was too much for her bring … to Emory I never have seen her
since … was buried – the girls were there with him keeping home & going
to school West went to the school house to see them said that Dora was

(4)

quite slight and stooping but Flora was plump & very pretty. They have a
little old house at the Mill Village. West met Lorenzo B. between the
center & streets said he had moved and that I should know where he lived
if he told the Baxler-Whitney place but I do not – West did not ask him
for his mother so don’t know whether she is living or not & had forgotten
& (?) he said he had five or six children – Marge (Mary)? Colter (?) is
trying to sell out her store don’t nkow whether she will succeed or not –
she was at Philadelphia and did not see her but a little while he went to
Randolph to see Katie & Carrie they have each of them a good place he
said Katie was taller than I am. She (unintellligible) mother moved does
not do any thing for them and the people that have them took them out of
sympathy because they had no where to go

(5)

you will remember (..) Clark (…) used to be at Bradford one year ago he
sold out of Bradford and went out to Burlington Kansas we did all we
could to prevent his going but he went – He thought he had got into the
(…) of the world he brought him a horse a small one and after a little
he bought (…) house & 20 acres of land right in the heart of the town
(…) $1800 for it – then he went in to different kinds of speculations
such as hogs & (…) but in Aug. he was taken sick had the fever that is
peculiar to that climate – we kept hearing from them by way of his wife
that he was getting better then he would be worse until news came that he
had got through with this life he leaves a wife & four children its
oldest thirteen its youngest little more than one (…) she probably will
have about 2000, not any more, and the last we heard from them

(6)

she was sick with this fever & two of the children how she is going to
get along I don’t know but Clark had never been sick in his life I am so
sorry that one of us did not go to them for Clark would have come to us
if we had been sick he was a true friend. I remember this (?) ago this
fall (?) when West was feeling so badly and was sick that I wrote him and
asked him to write hime he was (always full of fun) and say something
that would encourage him but instead of doing that he took the first
train of course and came right here to the store that he might know just
how every thing was before he saw West he staied a week and it did West
ever so much good he was always read to help but (…) now he is gone I
know it must have been so hard for him to give up his family – I think
his will will be a poor person to get along for the reason that she can
do so few things she is an excellent teacher & that is about all she can
do no housekeeper neither can she doe any sewing if (….) for her if
West goes out of business he probably will go out there and see if he can
help her to dispense of the business then I (…) wish I was at liberty
so I could go with him & go and see you – he will stop at your place if I
don’t go if he goes either in going or coming – Let us hear from you just
how you are & if Viola has got well wish she was a little older I would
set her up in business that is if she wanted to but she ought to go to
school some longer – my love to them all remember me to your neighbors
(…) you think (…) sister

Sara A. Gilbert
Nov. 21

(Caroline Noyes notes:) This is the last letter I ever received from her.
She died January 3, 1877, was buried at … the 5 day of January.

Carrie A. Noyes

12. Death: 1877 Jan 3. Died at the age of 43.

13. Residence: Montpelier, Washington, Vermont. Caroline’s address book
at one point records Montpelier VT as the address for N. W. GILBERT, but
this may also have been after Sarah’s death.

14. Cemetery: Northfield, Washington, Vermont, USA 1877 Jan 5. (33)
Caroline Atwell Noyes noted on her last letter from her sister, Sarah,
the date of her burial.

15. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Record, Cir 1885. (16)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from
Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

16. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Marriage Record, Cir 1885.
(28)
Recorded probably c. 1885 by Caroline Atwell, about
the same time of her recording Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell
family bible 17 Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

17. Accessory Document: Hiram Awell Family Death Record, Cir 1885. (13)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by
Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17
Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

18. Accessory Document: Caroline Atwell History by Pansy Noyes Bryant.
(14)

19. Edit : 2003 Oct.


4 F Caroline + Atwell (34)
Born: 1835 Oct 2 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA (35)
Christened:
Died: 1894 Apr 18 – Liberal, Barton, Missouri (36)
Buried:
Spouse: James Allen + Noyes (1826-1901) (34)
Marr. Date: 1859 Jun 28 – Brady Village, Kalamazoo, Michigan (37)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Birth: 1835 Oct 2 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (38)
Birth place an date provided by Carrie Atwell Noyes’ Family Record.

2. Photo: Caroline Noyes in middle age. (39)

3. Name: Caroline is perhaps a namesake for her aunt Caroline Atwell.

4. Residence: 1835 to early 1850s Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont,
USA. (11)

5. Census: Pg. 357 1840 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (12)

Roll: M704_546, Image 292, Page 357
Hiram ATWELL – 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – / – 2 1 – –
1

1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely?, Hiram Jr. being
already dead), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram); 2 females 5 to 10 (would be
Sarah and Caroline), 1 female 10 to 15 would be ?, and a female 30 to
40.

6. Mother’s Death: Rachel Scagel Atwell dies in childbirth when Caroline
is 7 years of age., 1843 Apr 17. The death occurred a day before
Caroline’s sister’s (Sarah) eighth birthday.

7. Sibling’s Death: Francis Atwell dies as an infant., 1843 Apr 20.

8. Father’s Death: Hiram Atwell dies when Caroline is about 14-15 years
of age., 1849 Dec 2, Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA.

9. Census: Pg. 298 1850 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (8)

Recorded 28 August 1850
6 1869/1879 Hiram ATWELL 48 m farmer $2000 b. VT
7 Metilda 44 f b. VT
8 Sarah A. 16 f attended school b. VT
9 John 14 m attended school b. VT
10 Caroline 12 f attended school b. VT
11 Mary 9 f attended school b. VT

12 1870 1880 Sarah BRYAN 55 f $10,000 b. MA
13 Lorna 26 f b. VT
14 Mary 16 f attended school b. VT
15 John 11 m attended school b. VT
16 George S. 26 m Farmer Married within the year b. VT
17 Milissa A 21 f married within the year b. VT

Sarah Sally SCAGEL, a sister of Rachel, who married Orson BRYAN, is
living next door. Another SCAGGEL in the census is on page 297A, which
is Thomas SCAGGELL, a brother of Rachel’s mother.

The “year” being recorded was from 2 June 1849 to June 1 1850, so that is
why Hiram appears, his death on 2 Dec 1849 falling midway. The date the
recording was made was thus August 1849 though for the 1850 census.

10. Sibling Marries: Caroline’s sister, Sarah, marries., 1852 Mar 7.

11. Occupation: Mill worker at Pacific Mills 25 Jun 1854 or 1857
Lawrence, Essex, Massachusetts, USA. (40)

An employment document shows that Caroline was working at Pacific Millis
in Lawrence, MA in 1854 or 1857 (it is difficult to tell whether it is a
4 or 7). Which came rather as a surprise as she had only been given,
after the death of her father in 1850, as going to live with relatives in
New Berlin, Wisconsin, attending school there, and meeting James Allen
NOYES there.

According to http://222.bfbresearch.com/jamesmorris.htm, Pacific Mills
was Incorporated in 1853 and commenced operaton in 1854. They were a
huge operation with 62,000 spindles, 1600 looms, 26 overseers, 800 males
employed and 1100 females. The Mills made Delaires, Cashmeres, Grallies,
Calicoes, and print Lawns.

I took a glance at the 1850 census for Lawrence (already a mill town) and
there are pages and pages of girls and young women living in dorm
situations.

Was Caroline at Pacific Mills because she was now in a situation for a
while where she was having to make her living?–because this isn’t
exactly going off to school.

I did a search for Atwells and Scagels in the 1850 Lawrence census. There
are none except for a Jerusha Scaggel, born Maine, age 24 who is working
in a mill and living in a dorm. Several families of SCHAGELS were in
Maine, or had been in Maine. Jerusha was likely a relation but it’s
unknown whether she was one Caroline would have known.

Caroline’s address book later records individuals from Lawrence MA. At
one point she had recorded a Hannah M. Wolger at 87 Hampshire Street in
Lawrence, MA, and a Marila WELLS at Lawrence, MA. Written at another
time she had Hannah M. WOLGER at No. 42 Broadway, South Lawrence, MA.

Hannah WOLGERS in the 1860 MA census are :

5th Ward
1829/2592 Thomas HASELDIN 38 m Operator $75 pesonal property b. England
Alice 29 House keeper b. NH
Mary 18 Operator b.MA
1829/2593 James G. WOLGER 26 Operator b. England (Essex Co. 4 West
Lawrence, page 342)
Hannah W. or M. (looks like a W but could be an M) 21 House keeper b.
England
Martha GOULD 53 House keeper b. England

4th Ward (Essex Co., 5 West Lawrence, page 382)
1907/2710 George WOLGER 43 Laborer b. England
Annie 45 Housekeeper b. England
May A. 33 Operative b. England
Sarah 29 Operative b. England
James 26 Operative b. England
Hannah 24 Operative b. England
William 14 b. England
Elizabeth A. 4 b. England
Emmanuel CHARTSWORTH 37 Operative b. England

It is the Hannah WOLGER, wife of James WOLGER, who is in Carrie’s address
book. James G. WOLGER appears in the 1880 census living at 87 (or may
read 89) Hampshire Street, but his wife is given as a Mary E., 42, born
NY and her parents b. NY, so it seems Hannah may have died by 1880.
Curiously, WOLGER is a rare enough name and the 1880 census shows them in
four areas. WOLGERS from Germany are in Patterson, Pasaic, NJ. There is
a pocket of WOLGERS in, as mentioned, Lawrence, MA. There is a family
with WOLGERS in Thornapple, Barry Co., MI, and a family from England in
Van Buren, Wayne County, MI.

It would seem Carrie knew the WOLGERS from her time at the mill. The
youngest child in the Lawrence Massachuseets WOLGER families is 4 in 1860
and is given as born in England. If this is correct the WOLGERS didn’t
arrive in MA until at least 1856 and as Carrie wouldn’t have had an
opportunity to meet them until at least 1856, she would have either been
in Lawrence Massachusetts for already a couple of years or arriving at
the Mills at about the same time they did.

The WOLGERS in Michigan in 1880 are a family that were in NY by 1845 and
in Michigan by at least 1854, according to birthdates of children. I
note this because it’s interesting they were in Michigan and
Massachusetts, but it’s likely coincidental.

12. Residence: 1850s New Berlin, Waukesha, Wisconsin. (41)
After the deaths of Hiram ATWELL and his wife Rachel SCAGEL, Caroline
ATWELL is given as having gone to live with an aunt. This has been given
by Grace Noyes Pinkerton, who first did the research, in both New Berlin,
Wisconsin and Berlin Heights, Ohio. It appears that Caroline was indeed
associated with both New Berlin and Berlin Heights for she had addresses
in her address book connecting her with both places.

George SCAGEL and Deborah Hunkins SCAGEL were one set of relatives in New
Berlin, Waukesha Co. WI in 1850. George’s sister, Sarah Sally Scagel
BRYAN, was living next to the Hiram Atwell family in 1850. As George
SCAGEL died in 1850, she perhaps went to live for a period with Deborah
HUNKINS SCAGEL who was a first cousin once removed through the HUNKINS
and also an aunt by way of being married to her mother’s brother, George.

George SCAGEL and wife Deborah HUNKINS were first cousins, he being a
nephew of her mother Hannah SCAGEL. Moses HUNKINS, Deborah’s father, was
a brother of Lydia HUNKINS who married Nathaniel ATWELL, father of Hiram
ATWELL who married Rachel SCAGEL, sister of George. Moses and Lydia
HUNKINS’ brother, Robert HASTINGS, had a grandson, Hazen Hastings
HUNKINS, who married Aurelia Seymour SCAGEL, daughter of George SCAGEL
and Deborah HUNKINS.

As noted, Aurelia, daughter of George and Deobrah, married Hazen Hastings
HUNKINS. They had a daughter named Carrie in 1855 who is possibly a
namesake of Caroline ATWELL, and was found in Caroline’s address book.

Daughter Deborah married Robert Hastings HUNKINS who was a nephew of
Hazen Hastings HUNKINS through his brother Robert W. who is given as
having died Feb 1845 in Wisconsin.

We have no way of knowing if Caroline went to Wisconsin before or after
her working at Pacific Mills.

Tracing the whereabouts of Caroline Atwell and James Noyes circulates to
some extent around the different communes of the time. Caroline’s
address book and family history offer a few leads.

Schetterly, who founded the Alphadelphia Association of which James’
father was a President, in a news article on Alphadelphia is given as
going to Lagrange , Indiana and Wisconsin then back to Michigan. No time
frame is given but in the 1850 census Dr. Schetterly appears to be
already back in Michigan. We know James Noyes was in Lagrange June 3
1848.

Grace Noyes Pinkerton recorded, “(James) was forever looking for other
communities that were trying out the theory of Alphadelphianism. He went
to Berlin Heights, Ohio, where such a group existed. Here he met Caroline
Atwell of Waterbury, VT. She was living with an aunt and attending
school.” Because this leaves out the time she worked at Pacific Mills,
and because the time at New Berlin has apparently become confused with
the time at Berlin Heights, it’s difficult to put the decade into
chronological order in relation to Caroline and where she was at what
time.

There was a Fouerier community in Fond du Lac County, Wisconsin called
the Ceresco Commune (1847-1851, given as dissolving December
1849…record books continued until 1857). Fond du Lac is a couple of
counties over from Waukesha.
http://www.ripon.edu/library/archives/reference/history.html

Though the Wisconsin Phalanx ended in 1857, its day as a commune were
finished by 1851. It was supposed to have been a very successful
community that disbanded at its height when it was still doing very well,
and sold out its holdings for a good sum, making quite a profit.

The Wisconsin Phalanx ending in 1857 and the Berlin Heights experiment in
OH beginning in 1857, so it is perhaps plausible that James may have gone
to Wisconsin where he met Caroline (she is at the mill in 1857 but may
not have been there for long), and then they both traveled to Berin
Heights in Ohio. Sarah Melissa NOYES ended up in WI for a while with her
husband John SLATER. They were married there in 1857. It may be that
Sarah traveled there with James, and the 1857 marriage may help in
placing Caroline and James perhaps meeting about that time in Wisconsin.
Or as Pansy, their granddaughter states at one point, they may have met
instead at Berlin Heights and Caroline’s time in New Berlin was separate
from her meeting James NOYES. Regardless, they were together for a
period of time in Ohio, as also evidenced by Caroline’s address book
which gives the following name: Francis Barry Berlin Heights, Ohio.

The 1850 census shows for Ohio, Erie County, Berlin:

167/167 Samuel S. BARRY 25 blacksmith
Elsie H. BARRY 23
Francis O. BARRY 24 preacher after ancient gospel
George BUCKINGHAM 21 wagon maker
William BUCKINGHAM 23 wagon maker

I would imagine this is the same BARRY as below:

Francis Barry. Free Love community; ed. with Cordelia Age of Freedom,
cited History of the Firelands, comprising Huron and Erie Counties, Ohio
. . . (Cleveland, W.W. Williams, 1879), 487; Age of Freedom 1858)

Francis Barry had to do with the Berlin Heights Community, known as a
kind of Free Love community, and published with Cordelia the “Age of
Freedom” circular.

Hudson Tuttle wrote on Francis Barry, and apparently hadn’t much
affection for his journal:

The
Berlin people are noted for tolerance, but it may be presumed that the
socialists, with their strange ideas, did not always find their paths
strewn with roses, and the citizens still retain fresh in their
memories, how, when Francis Barry attempted to mail a number of the
obnoxious “Age of Freedom”, twenty Berlin women seized the mail-sack in
which he had brought it on his shoulder to the office, and made a bonfire
in the street. The following journals were successively started by the
socialists and ran brief careers: “Social Revolutionist”, conducted by J.
S. Patterson, 1857; “Age of Freedom”, commenced in 1858, Frank and
Cordelia Barry and C. M. Overton, editors; “Good Time Coming”, 1859,
edited by J. P. Lesley and C. M. Overton; the “New Republic”, 1862,
edited by Francis Barry; “The Optimist” and “Kingdom of Heaven”, 1869,
Thomas Cook, editor; “The Principia”, or Personality”, 1868, N. A. Brown,
editor; the “New Campaign”, 1871, C. M. Overton, editor; “The Toledo
Sun”, moved from Toledo to Be lin Heights in 1875, by John A. Laut.
Besides these, two local newspapers were published for some time: “The
Bulletin”, by W. B. Harrison, commenced in 1870; and the “Index” by F. J.
Miles, commenced in 1875.

Whatever the sequence of events, Caroline and James would have been in
Berlin Heights Ohio at the time the of the Community there.

John Humphrey NOYES, founder of the Oneida Community and distant relative
of James Allen, wrote the following on the Berlin Heights experiment.


From The Putney Community by John Humphrey Noyes, compiled
and edited by George Wallingford Noyes

Chapter 19

FREE LOVE

SWEDENBORG was not alone in his hostility to marriage. The socialistic
innovators, whose experiments we have reviewed, attacked not merely the
economic hilt also the sexual foundations of modern society.

The religious colonies that came early from Europe felt instinctively
that marriage was antagonistic to communism. Partly for this reason and
partly in the interest of a supposedly higher religious life the Shakers
adopted celibacy as a cardinal principle. The Rappites too were
originally celibate. Even after marriage was allowed in order that they
might “raise their own members,” sexual commerce beyond the requirements
of reproduction was prohibited, and virginity was held to be more
commendable than marriage. The Ephratists, the Zoarites and the Amana
Society tolerated marriage, but looked upon it with disfavor.

Robert Owen did not attempt the immediate displacement of marriage. But
he included marriage with irrational religion and private property as one
of the “awful trinity” of man’s oppressors, and contemplated its ultimate
destruction. His son, Robert Dale Owen, was outspoken in his enmity to
marriage, and became a leading advocate of free divorce. Both father and
son were enthusiastic disciples of Modern Spiritualism, a religious cult
of which Free Love was believed by many the social complement.

Certain groups of “antinomian Perfectionists” renounced marriage and
mated by spiritual affinity. [1] Noyes and the Putney Perfectionists, as
we have seen, held aloof from these groups, believing that marriage was
ordained by God as the law of the apostasy and was not to be set aside
until salvation from sin and the resurrection of the body had been
attained.

The Mormons in 1843 adopted polygamy, which Noyes called a dilution of
marriage.

Like Robert Owen, American Fourierists were cautious of im-

1 Religious Experience of John Humphrey Noyes Chap. XIX.

186

mediate changes in the law of marriage. But Henry J. Raymond showed in
his public debate with Horace Greeley that as a system Fourierism
permitted “higher degrees of amorous freedom” after the human race had
become regenerated by socialistic institutions.

The socialistic reformer whose teachings were the most highly subversive
of marriage was Josiah Warren, inventor of the term “Individual
Sovereignty.” At Modern Times, Long Island, his final socialistic
experiment, each member was supposed to know his or her best interests in
the sexual relation as in everything else, and no questions were asked.
It was here that Warren in 1851 enlisted Stephen Pearl Andrews to
popularize the doctrine of Individual Sovereignty by a series of lectures
and by a pamphlet distributed gratuitously. Among the converts were Dr.
and Mrs. Thomas L. Nichols, water-cure specialists of New York City. They
were publicity adepts and prepared themselves at Modern Times to
broadcast the principle of Free Love based on Individual Sovereignty and
Modern Spiritualism.

The essential connection between Free Love and Spiritualism is thus
stated by C. M. Overton, editor of The Social Revolutionist, a Free Love
journal: “Free Love is a doctrine of Spiritualism. I say of Spiritualism,
not of Spiritualists. Many recognize the facts of Spiritualism who know
little of its philosophy. But will any intelligent Spiritualist deny that
the concurrent testimony of the spheres proves that their inhabitants are
controlled in their love relations not by arbitrary outside authority but
by the law of attraction, affinity or Free Love? Is it not a conceded
fact that the angels do not have to be hauled up before a magistrate to
legalize their marriages? How supremely ridiculous the idea that the men
and women of Paradise live together on the cat and dog principle because
it wouldn’t be respectable to separate! They are not so generous there as
to sacrifice their individual happiness for the good of the community.
They are not so senseless there as to stay together and scratch and pull
hair from a sense of duty to their children or other members of the
community, when these other members are doing the same thing from the
same laudable motive! The fact that they break up false relations there
and form new ones is as well established and is just as much a part of
the Spiritual or Harmonic Philosophy as the doctrine of Endless
Progression.”

In 1852 the Nicholses joined with Andrews in establishing at Port
Chester, New York, a Free Love School under the guise of a water-cure and
vegetarian Medical College. It was suppressed by the authorities. Dr.
Nichols then put forth a flowery prospectus

187

of “The Institute of Desarrollo.” This was to be based frankly on
Individual Sovereignty, and was expected to garner all the results that
had been vainly looked for in the Fourieristic Associations. A site was
selected near Modern Times, the cellar dug, the foundation wall partly
laid, when the plan was abandoned. Dr. Nichols explained that a campaign
of education should precede practical attempts. To this be now addressed
himself.

His first move was the establishment of a magazine called Nichols’
Journal, in which Spiritualism, health and social relations were
discussed.

Next he published a book of five hundred pages entitled Esoteric
Anthropology. This, he prefaced, was “no book for the center-table, the
library shelf, or the counter of a bookstore.” It was a private treatise
on physiology and health, written “not to get consultations but to
prevent their necessity, not to attract patients but to keep them away.”
Free Love, though hinted, was not directly advocated. During 1853 and
1854 twenty-six thousand copies were sold.
To this great audience Dr. Nichols in 1854 introduced his second book
entitled Marriage, in which he openly presented his threefold creed,
Individual Sovereignty, Spiritualism, and Free Love. Marriage ran through
three large editions during its first year. By the fall of 1854 Dr.
Nichols’ writings were circulating actively in every State of the Union,
especially in the west.

So widespread was the popularity of these new doctrines that Dr. Nichols
ventured upon overt acts in the full glare of publicity. With his former
partner, Stephen Pearl Andrews, he instituted a series of “Sociables” in
New York City, which were broken up by the police.

Dr. Nichols now found himself accepted as the prophet of a new age by
scattered thousands eager to share in its benefits. How could he make his
followers known to each other and commence the realization of their
dream? The “spirits,” by whose illumination he says he had written his
books, came again to his aid. They directed the formation of a
“Protective Union.” A Central Bureau was established in New York City
with Dr. Nichols as Secretary. All who wished to associate were enrolled
as members and received a printed list of names and addresses. Thus a
tempting opportunity was offered to affinity-hunters.

Early in 1856 Dr. Nichols began to see signs of a hurricane arising from
the zephyr be had sown. Sensational charges were made in the newspapers
and he found it necessary to issue a statement in his own defense.
Hitherto no oath of secrecy had been exacted

188

from members, but now a circular was sent out prescribing a Declaration
of Principles and secrecy of the most guarded kind. The Central Bureau
was removed to Cincinnati away from the hostile press of the east and
nearer the main body of its constituents. Dr. Nichols began to hint in
the Journal that sexual commerce should be limited to propagation. In May
1856 he launched a “Harmonic Home” called Memnonia at Yellow Springs,
Ohio. But he gave notice in the Social Revolutionist, that Memnonia would
be “provisionally and necessarily a despotism,” as wise and benevolent as
circumstances would permit.

But the western disciples of Dr. Nichols, trained by him in Individual
Sovereignty, could brook no control. They turned their backs on Memnonia,
and found a gathering-point at Berlin Heights, a small town near
Cleveland, Ohio, where Individual Sovereignty, Spiritualism and Free Love
were smoldering and could easily be fanned into flame.

Memnonia was Dr. Nichols’ last attempt at social reconstruction. After
its failure, which was complete, Dr. and Mrs. Nichols recanted their
errors to Archbishop Purcelle of Cincinnati and were received into the
Catholic Church.
With the exit of Dr. Nichols the “Nicolaitan doctrine,” as it was called
by Noyes in allusion to the doctrine which according to Revelation 2: 15
Christ “hated,” entered upon its final phase. The Rising Star Association
of Darke County, Ohio, believing that a large organization necessarily
infringed the rights of the individual, had striven since August 1853 to
realize Individual Sovereignty in a small group with the hope that later
a federation of small groups could safely be effected. In the spring of
1857 this Association removed from Darke County to Berlin Heights, and
its press, The Social Revolutionist, having taken over the subscription
list of Nichols’ Monthly, became the organ of fierce Spiritualistic Free
Lovers eager for advance on a large scale. A convention was held at
Berlin Heights in the fall of 1856, another in the fall of 1857. The next
year thirty householders pledged themselves to dispose of their property
and remove to Berlin Heights as soon as practicable. But the public had
become aroused. The Social Revolutionist for November 1857 was seized and
burnt by a mob, and the number for January 1858 was the last. After this,
though many Spiritualistic Free Lovers continued to live at Berlin
Heights, the Free Love movement which had centered there fell into
complete disorganization.

Reviewing the fruits of Berlin Heights Free Love a prominent convert
asserted that among less than one hundred persons there

189

were several suicides; that one man was in prison charged with murdering
his wife’s sister, with whom he had been intimate; that three-quarters of
the married couples had been separated and their families broken up; that
many children born in Free Love had been forsaken; and that venereal
disease had become alarmingly prevalent.

It isn’t as though John Humphrey Noyes didn’t have his own scandals to
negotiate in the end, fleeing Oneida under the specter of statutory rape,
men of the Oneida Community disgruntled at Noyes being the one who
introduced females (some as young as 13) to the life of the Community in
which it is said that every member was free to turn down sexual
relations, but to do so could mean reprisal for selective love, which was
seen even as a detrimental relationship even in the bonding of parents
and children, for which reason children were removed from the care of
their parents when weaned and placed in the Community Home. The
abhorence of selective love also prompted the burning of the childrens’
dolls.

13. Marriage: 1859 Jun 28, Brady Village, Kalamazoo, Michigan. (35)
Married at 23 to James Allen NOYES who was 32.

14. Census: 1860 Wakeshma, Kalamazoo, Michigan. (42)
Nearby is a George SLATER, 22, b. OH, who may be a relation of John
SLATER who married James NOYES’ sister Melissa in 1857 and was living
with her in Wisconsin.

1860 MICHIGAN KALAMAZOO CO. WAKESHMA CENSUS
pg. 43 (16 of 18)
Lyman FAIRCHILD and family
John WEBSTER and Lydia (in above FAIRCHILD household)
306/308 Charles S. BROWN 27 farmer $800 $335 b. NY
Phebe J. 22 B. MI
Willard 2
Luther 2/12
306/309 Thomas J. PIERCE 33
Nancy 22
307/310 George R. SLATER 22 day laborer b. OH $800 $320 b. OH
Sarah A. FAIRCHILD or FAIRCHILER 42
Mary A. SANDERSON 19 b. MI
John FAIRCHILD 26 b. OH
Julia 14 b. MI
Jane 12
Lucinda 9
Hannah M. 2
308/311 Samuel RETON 50 farmer 500 437 b. NJ
Sarah 42 b. PA
Alice 18 b. NJ
William 15 b. PA
Harriet COYSTER 12 b. IA
Daniel Reton 7 b. PA
Samuel R. 4 b. MI
Reynolds 1 b. MI
Anna MERRILL 20 b. IA
Charles 7/12 b. MI
309/312 Thomas RETON 52 1000 320 b. NY
Esther 38 b. CT
Elizabeth 10 b. NY
Eugene HOWARD 14
310/313 James A NOYS 33 farmer $1200 b. MI
Carrie A. 25 b. VT

311/314 Henry BILLINGS 28 day laborer $25 b. NY
Margaret 18 b. IA
Lewis 7/12 b. NY
312/315 Joseph MERRITT 57 $1000 $310 b. MA
Lury B. 51 b. VT
Nelson H. 27 b. NY
Hester A. 23
Almena A. (?) 14
Charles D. 3 b. MI
313/316 James PRESTON 33 $600 300 b. NY
Lucy E. 28 b. OH
Herbert S.2 b.MI

15. Child’s Birth: Emma Viola is born., 1860 Dec 15.

16. Child’s Birth: Cora Rachel is born., 1863 Apr 19.

17. Child’s Birth: Victor Hugo is born., 1865 Aug 20.

18. Photo: James and Caroline Noyes, Viola and Cora, Cir 1866, Anna,
Union, Illinois. (43)

Emma Viola stands before James. Cora Rachel is seated in Caroline’s lap.

19. Child’s Birth: Allen Marble is born., 1867 Oct 30.

20. Child’s Birth: Paul is born., 1869 Nov 24.

21. Census: Pg. 388 1870 Anna, Union, Illinois. (44)

Page: 388
Roll: M593_284
Image: 33
Page No. 32 (given on census sheet)
Enumerated 18 of June
14 248/239 NOYES, J. Andrew 45 mw Farmer $3000 $250
b. MI
15 C. Ammanda 35 fw House Keeper b. VT
16 E. Violetta 8 fw b. MI attended school
17 C. Rebecca 7 fw b. MI attended school
18 V. Henry 4 mw b. IL
19 A. Monroe 3 mw b. IL
20 Patric 1/12 b. IL

21-26 249/240 Household of Davis CALVIN 47 and Mary V., he of IL and she
of AR
27-31 250/241 Household of R. Henry CALVIN and Clarissa, he of VA, she of
NC.
32 251/242 HARMAN Asa 40 mw Farmer $2000 $200 b. VT
33 Susan 39 fw House Keeper b. NY
34 O. Ephriam 15 mw b. MI
35 N. Edward 6 mw b. MI Can’t write

COMMENT: What happened here? Did the census taker just record initials
and then reenter the information and make up names while doing so? The
J. Andrew NOYES household is that of James Allen NOYES and the children
should read Emma Viola, Cora Rachel, Victor Hugo, Allen Marble, and Paul.
The children in the Asa HARMON household are Orrin Ellie and Edgar. The
“Susan” as Asa’s wife is probably Lucy as in the 1880 census.

22. Child’s Birth: Ray is born., 1874 Jan 4. Ray will marry Elizabeth
BREWER. DIRECT LINE

23. Address Book:
Caroline’s address book shows:

J.A. Noyes Anna, Union Co., Illinois
N.W. Gilbert Montpelier, Vermont (this would have been her sister, Sarah)

Hannah M. Wolger 87 Hampshire St., Lawrence, Massachusetts
Mary Chilton Franklinville, N.C.
Marilla Wells Lawrence, Massachusetts

Written at another time:
Hannah M. Wolger No. 42 Broadway, South Lawrence, Massachusetts
Francis Barry Berlin Heights, Ohio

On second sheet, sometime later, in blue ink
Miss Carrie A. Hunkins Box 453 Waukesha, Wisconsin
SOURCE: Nancy Benton April 26 2003

The entry for Hannah WOLGER on Broadway is likely to be at an earlier
point in time than the Hampshire Street address, as her husband is seen
on Hamphsire Street in the 1880 census, and Hannah appears to have died
as her husband is then married to a Mary E. who was born in NY, not
England.

As for Carrie HUNKINS in Wisconsin, the 1880 census shows:

WI, Waukesha Co. Waukesha
A. S. HUNKINS widowed female 55 b. VT parents b. VT
W. F. son 23 b. WI
A. L. daughter in law 19 b. WI
Carrie daughter 24 b. WI
J. W. DRUITT other 26 b. MA merchant father b. VT
E. W. CHAPIN other 28 b. WI lawyer parents b. VT

This family would be that of Hazen Hastins HUNKINS b. 19 May 1820 in
Danville, Caledonia Co. VT, died 29 March 1879 Waukesha, Waukesha Co. WI
and Aurelia Seymour SCAGEL (daughter of George SCAGEL and Deborah
HUNKINS) b. 4 Sept 1825 in Waterbury, Washington Co. VT, married 25 Nov
1847 in New Berlin, Waukesha Co. WI.

Carrie HUNKINS was married in 1881 so this would have been noted previous
to her marriage.

24. Note:
Cousin Caroline FISK HALL preceded Caroline Atwell NOYES to the
Kansas-Missouri area about 1870 according to the census.


The Marias des Cygne Massacre
Linn County Kansas near Trading Post

by Pansy Noyes BRANT

My great grandfather Hiram Atwell had a sister Olive (born Mar. 21, 1808)
who married a man named Clarke Fiske of Eden VT. They had a daughter
Caroline Fiske who married Austin Wilbur Hall of Trading Post Kansas.
Caroline Fiske and my grandmother Caroline Atwell Noyes were cousins.
They visited each other when they came to Kansas and Missouri to live.

Carolin Fiske Hall once brought my grandmother a gift of a paisley shawl.
At my grandmother’s death this shawl was given to my aunt Viola Noyes
Harmon and she in turn passed it on to her adopted son and also nephew
Robert Harmon.

Austin and Amos Hall came from Eden VT. in 1857 to West point Landing.
They were without money and walked to Trading Post Kansas that looked
much more promising than Kansas City did at that time.

The bright sun and glare on the tall prairie grass caused Austin to
develop a very severe case of sore eyes and he was unable to see any
distance.

During the next winter the border warfare over slavery grew very bitter.
Most of those on the Kansas side were “Free Staters” and ruffians from
the Mo side kept stirring up trouble.

On May 19 1858 a man named Hamilton with 32 men came over near Trading
Post and gathered eleven men and took them to a ravine east of town and
had the 32 men standing on each side of the slope and shoot the eleven
men down like dogs. Amos and Austin Hall were among the 11 men Austin was
driving a team of oxen from the forge and could have gotten away except
the sore eyes kept him from seeing the enemy as they came toward him.

Most of the men were killed instantly, but Austin Hall did not get hurt
at all. He feigned death and dropped with the man in front of him. The
ruffans came down and kicked the victims to be sure they were dead.
Austin Hall stayed perfectly still and was declared dead.

As soon as they left Austin went for help He met a woman who had seen the
men led away and had hitched up a ox team to a wagon filled with bedding
and water.

Soon after this massacre Austin Hall went back to Eden VT. to have
treatment for his eyes. He was very slow recovering his sight and did not
return to Kansas until April 14, 1865.

He married Carolin Fiske Nov. 28, 1869 and to this union were born Amos
Homer, Carlton Fisk and John Austin Hall. All live fairly close to their
old home and are very prosperous.

Austin W. Hall and Carolin Hall are buried in the same cemetary where a
monument is erected to the Marais des Cygne Massacre.

Courtesy of Nancy Benton. Transcribed as is by JMK.

Note that in the 1840 census, the Clark and Olive FISK are living two
households from an Amos HALL.

25. Correspondence: Letter from Sara Gilbert Atwell to Caroline Atwell
Noyes, 1876 Nov 21. (32)

417 Shawmut Ave.

My dear Sister

It has been a long time since I have written you still I have not
forgotten you I think of you every day and wonder when I am to see you
again I hope you & Viola are back to health and the rest of the family
well – I am much better than in the summer. West is not very well – his
partner was sick for near three months this summer & it was very hard for
him. He is talking of selling out again although no one knows it here and
if he does he will take a long rest perhaps go out west – if he was not
so miserable I should feel terribly about it – he has done very well
since he went back into the office and

(2)

if I could feel sure that he was going to be able to work for two years
to come I should feel terrible but I don’t want him to work on the
(unintelligible) when he is not able to be we are fated to be unsettled
all the time if he does go out of business I shall try to get out of the
store by the way how many (unintelligible) has been & is there a chance
for another some time when you are in town wish you would work not the
(unintelligible) but some good responsible person that would know what
the chances would be there for the spring trade – I can’t sell to Mrs.
Fill (?) because she has not go any thing to buy with and I may be
obliged to take the goods somewhere to set them up and perhaps
(unintellible) & then sell out – I can’t tell what I shall do would go to
(unintelligible) I could hear of where there was a good chance – there
are many things I like about being in a store

(3)

but if West is going to be miserable (unintelligible) go to be here – I
don’t get home until after he is in bed almost every night – I have had
so much (unintelligible) for the last year that I shalt like to be
relieved of some of it – for a while – business is at a stand still here
as well as at other places – don’t expect much until the Election is
settled (unintellible) probably here more (unintelligible) for you are in
a democratic (?) district I believe – West went to VT this summer went to
(unintelligible) at Waterbury took (unintelligible) with (?) is not there
any more she died the last of July with softening of the brain (…) and
that it was too much for her bring … to Emory I never have seen her
since … was buried – the girls were there with him keeping home & going
to school West went to the school house to see them said that Dora was

(4)

quite slight and stooping but Flora was plump & very pretty. They have a
little old house at the Mill Village. West met Lorenzo B. between the
center & streets said he had moved and that I should know where he lived
if he told the Baxler-Whitney place but I do not – West did not ask him
for his mother so don’t know whether she is living or not & had forgotten
& (?) he said he had five or six children – Marge (Mary)? Colter (?) is
trying to sell out her store don’t nkow whether she will succeed or not –
she was at Philadelphia and did not see her but a little while he went to
Randolph to see Katie & Carrie they have each of them a good place he
said Katie was taller than I am. She (unintellligible) mother moved does
not do any thing for them and the people that have them took them out of
sympathy because they had no where to go

(5)

you will remember (..) Clark (…) used to be at Bradford one year ago he
sold out of Bradford and went out to Burlington Kansas we did all we
could to prevent his going but he went – He thought he had got into the
(…) of the world he brought him a horse a small one and after a little
he bought (…) house & 20 acres of land right in the heart of the town
(…) $1800 for it – then he went in to different kinds of speculations
such as hogs & (…) but in Aug. he was taken sick had the fever that is
peculiar to that climate – we kept hearing from them by way of his wife
that he was getting better then he would be worse until news came that he
had got through with this life he leaves a wife & four children its
oldest thirteen its youngest little more than one (…) she probably will
have about 2000, not any more, and the last we heard from them

(6)

she was sick with this fever & two of the children how she is going to
get along I don’t know but Clark had never been sick in his life I am so
sorry that one of us did not go to them for Clark would have come to us
if we had been sick he was a true friend. I remember this (?) ago this
fall (?) when West was feeling so badly and was sick that I wrote him and
asked him to write hime he was (always full of fun) and say something
that would encourage him but instead of doing that he took the first
train of course and came right here to the store that he might know just
how every thing was before he saw West he staied a week and it did West
ever so much good he was always read to help but (…) now he is gone I
know it must have been so hard for him to give up his family – I think
his will will be a poor person to get along for the reason that she can
do so few things she is an excellent teacher & that is about all she can
do no housekeeper neither can she doe any sewing if (….) for her if
West goes out of business he probably will go out there and see if he can
help her to dispense of the business then I (…) wish I was at liberty
so I could go with him & go and see you – he will stop at your place if I
don’t go if he goes either in going or coming – Let us hear from you just
how you are & if Viola has got well wish she was a little older I would
set her up in business that is if she wanted to but she ought to go to
school some longer – my love to them all remember me to your neighbors
(…) you think (…) sister

Sara A. Gilbert
Nov. 21

(Caroline Noyes notes:) This is the last letter I ever received from her.
She died January 3, 1877, was buried at … the 5 day of January.

Carrie A. Noyes

26. Note: 1879 Mar 29.
Also, among some of (Caroline Atwell Noye’s) belongings I found a
calling card for Mrs. H. H. Hunkins, edged in black, as though in
mourning.

SOURCE: Nancy Benton 2 May 2003

Hazen Hastings HUNKINS died 29 March 1879. This was the family in
Wisconsin that Carrie may have stayed with at one time.

27. Correspondence: Letter from N. W. GILBERT to Caroline., 1879 Apr 18.
(45)
Caroline was talking of going for a visit east. It’s not known if she
made the trip that year or not. Norman GILBERT doesn’t seem to appear in
the 1880 census.


620 Tremant St.
Boston Friday April 18, 1879.

My Dear Sister –

It is a long time since I heard from you, but longer since you have heard
from me. Your letter of November and December reached me in a short
time, being forwarded from Northfield to me here. I came here in
December, and after a few weeks opened an office in the house where we
used to live. I haven’t come to stay, however, as I like the country too
well to want to stay here, and besides, I have not the physical ability
to endure the confinement and strain of a long continued city practice.

(2)

But what I did come for was to start an office here, and after a little
while let another man enter it, and I slip away and go back into the
country. I don’t (?) but my scheme will prove a failure, but am in
life’s net. I shall finally go back to Northfield by (?) and let the
Northfield man live this. We don’t say that yet but that was the plan
between him and me, as I had acquaintances here and we thought I could
start a place better than he could. A great many of my old customers are
dead and moved away and changed so I can’t find them but I have found
some of them.

So much for myself and what I am doing. I got the house where we used to
live ready furnished, so have not put very much money into it, so will
not lose much if I don’t succeed; but

(3)

shall make it succeed if we can.

I was very glad to hear that you were thinking more or less about coming
east once more. And hope your plans in reference to it may be carried
out, and that you will come. But why not come before “next Fall” – or is
the weather too hot for you in the Summer. If you will come towards the
last of June – or sometime in June – and stay here till first of July, I
will go with you to Vermont, though I don’t suppose I could be with you
much after we had got up there. I shall probably be up there the most of
July and August, and may not come back though I may have to come back and
stay a while longer. But if you don’t come till Fall, of course you will
come and stay with me a while wherever I am. I want to see you, and
would be very glad to have you come to New England again.

If it is not too late to send congratulations to Viola on her accession
to the married fraternity, she will please accept mine

(4)

I hope she has a happy life before her, and that her husband will prove
to be a good one, and will succeed in his profession when he gets ready
to practice it. Please remember me kindly to them, as well, as to Mr.
Noyes and the rest of the children. As ever yours,

N.W.G.

(5)

Of course you always remember when the 18th of April comes, that it was
Sarah’s birthday. Today she would have been fortyfive years old. And do
you know how unattractive old age looked to her. Not in other people, as
I know of, but she looked upon it as it slowly approached her, though yet
quite in the distance, with great disfavor. Will, it never came to her
in this life, and perhaps now she is where nobody grows old. I was at a
Spiritualistic circle — by invitation of the man who got it up — and it
was whispered by what purported to be a spirit that she was there, but I
was satisfied that the whole thing

(6)

was a cheat and a fraud. I have gathered a little testimony lately,
however, that tends to show the spirits communicate, but does not prove
it by any means.

I am quite strong in my faith in a hereafter, but can get (?) that will
remove the everlasting doubt. However, if there is none, we never shall
find it out, and nobody can ever prove that there isn’t.

Please write me and let me know how you get along, and about your coming
east. I suppose you are picking strawberries – or nearly ready to pick
them by this time. They are here some now but come from the south. The
season is very cold and backward. Has been snowing a little here today,
though only a few stray flakes. It rains when it doesn’t snow. That the
sunshine will come by (?).

Truly yours, N.W.G.

28. Census: Pg. 25B 1880 Anna, Union, Illinois. (46)

Year: 1880; Census Place: Anna, Union, Illinois; Roll: T9_254; Family
History Film: 1254254; Page: 25B; Enumeration District: 113; Image: 0207
Enumerated 36 and 28 of June by Joseph Levey
33 337/369 HARMON Asa wm 52 md Farmer b. VT parents b. VT
34 Lucy wf Wife 51 md Keeping House can’t write b. OH parents b. NY
35 Edgar wm Son 15 MI father b. VT mother b. OH
36 Almina sister 54 unable to read or write VT parents b. VT
37 Ida LEE wf19 Boarding sg b. IL parents b. IL
38 Charles LEE 16 wm Boarding sg Laborer IL parents b. IL
39 338/370 NOYES J. A. wm 53 md. Farmer b. MI
father b. MA mother b. NY
40 Caroline wf 44 Keeing house b. VT parents b. MA
41 Cora wf 17 Daughter sg b. MI father b. MI mother b. VT
42 Victor wm 14 sg Son b. IL father b. MI mother b. VT
43 Allen wm 12 sg Son b. IL father b. MI mother b. VT
44 Paul wm 10 sg Son b. IL father b. MI mother b. VT
45 Ray wm 6 sg sg Son b. IL father b. MI mother b. VT

46 338/371 HARMON Orin wm 25 Son-in-law md Farmer b. MI father b. VT
mother b. (VT written over Ohio or vice versa)
47 E. Viola wf 19 Daughter md. Farmer b. MI father b. MI mother b. VT
48 Chloe DAVIS wf 70 wd keeping house unable to read or write b. NC
father b. NC mother b. VA

COMMENT: Chloe DAVIS looks like she was inadvertantly placed in the Orin
HARMON household, as 338/372 continues with daughters of Chloe’s. Viola
and her husband Orin HARMON reside in the J. A. NOYES’ household. There
don’t appear to be other Michigan families nearby.

29. Migration: 1882 Aug 9, , Barton, Missouri. (47) Departed Anna IL for
Barton Co. MO on this day. The trip of about 300 miles took nearly three
weeks. Caroline kept a diary for nine days.


COPY OF CAROLINE ATWELL NOYES’ DIARY OF TRIP FROM ANNA, IL
TO LIBERAL, MO IN AUGUST 1882

(The trip of about 300 miles took nearly three weeks; however Caroline’s
diary entries ended on the ninth day.)

August 9, 1882 – Left home at 9 o’clock. The horses in the big wagon were
frightened at wagon cover and began to run when they started. Hiram held
them and stopped them before we got to Mr. Harmon’s gate. I walked to
Jonesboro, stopped at courthouse for important paper. Got started at 2
afternoon. Camped at night on the bank of Mississippi River ten miles
north of Cape.

August 10 – Started at 7 A.M. and reached the ferry at 11 A.M. Crossed
alright. Camped for dinner in a little grove of trees by a stream of
water. Got started half past 2 P.M. Camped just beyond Jackson just
before dark. Spread carpet on ground and made beds for four. Made up bed
in big wagon for Mr. Noyes and Paul and in the small one for Cora and
myself. The boys kept guard all night. Had a good fire and kept the
lantern lamp burning.

August 11 – Got started early. A pleasant day but cool enough so I have
worn waterproof cloak all the afternoon. We are camped at noon on the
bank of a clear beautiful stream of water. Camped about sundown in a nice
grove of timber near a small stream of water. Cora got a good supper
fried potatoes and corn cakes. Everybody went to bed and all rested well
and did not guard horses. Hiram cut a small tree and wove it in other
small trees and made it an excellent tying place.

Friday – Got started early and got along very well. Country rough and
stony. Came over a long ridge that had wild timber land. There were many
wild flowers, some pretty enough for ornamental gardens. Harry shot one
rabbit and one of our boys caught one fish. Did not come to water at noon
so drove till between one and two when we came to a nice creek. Camped a
little after sundown near a dwelling house and the road was fenced but
the boys managed to gather wood and we were quite comfortable. Kept guard
all night.

August 12 – We started at seven. Drove four miles to Farmington, a town
of two thousand inhabitants two miles from the Iron Mountain Railroad.
The country around it is very good and we were told was worth $30 to $50
per acre. We bought supplies at Farmington. Have passed thru two toll
gates and one covered bridge, quite a number not covered. The road is
gravelled and mostly level. A few high hills and a great deal of rock. We
passed through Iron Mountain town the middle of the afternoon. Camped a
half mile east of Bell View. Did not get supper ready till after dark and
washed dishes by lamplight.

Sunday 13th – Rested till noon. Then started. Drove 10 miles over a rough
wild country. Plenty of wood and water where we camped but horseflies and
sand ticks were very bad.

14th – Started about seven. Drove thru a wild hilly country, did not come
to water at noon but stopped and got one pail of water for the folks and
fed the horses. We ate our dinner without making fire, then drove on a
mile and a half when we came to water and watered the horses. Late in the
afternoon we came to a country store. Bought supplies. A little before
sundown we came to Turnback Hill and camped.

15 Aug – A slight shower in the night. The boys gathered their bedclothes
from the ground and threw it in the wagon. We passed over Turnback Hill
without difficulty. It has rained during the forenoon part of the time
but we kept on. The country is rough and wild. Stopped at noon. Fed the
horses and ate our dinner of canned blackberries and crackers. Sprinkled
a little in the afternoon but cleared off and the sun shone and it was
quite warm. Camped a little before sundown near a stream of water one
mile east of Salem.

Aug 16 – It rained last night before we got our supper ready and we got
in the big wagon and ate it, but the rain got in both wagons and wet our
bedding and things. We all slept in the wagons. I lay in the wet all
night. The sun shines bright this morning. They have packed the wet
things and we are about starting.

17 – Drove till sundown thru a new country, hardly any houses and those
mostly tiny log ones. The roads…

The diary ended mid sentence. In later years she told her granddaughter,
Pansy, an interesting story about the trip. One of the men realized the
second or third day out that he had left his rifle leaning against a tree
the night before. Because he felt he needed the rifle to survive, he left
his family with the rest of the group and rode his horse back to the
former night’s campsite to get the gun. He told them that he would catch
up with them later. He was never heard from again.

30. Accessory Document: Noyes Family Constitution, Cir 1883. (48)

31. Note: Carrie’s record of a dream., 1885 Feb 7. (49)

CARRIE NOYES
DREAM

Feb. 7 1885

I also dreamed of being at some neighbors
house and seeing a woman and some
children – and it seems I sent a young
woman to return a cloak to Mrs. Boulwares
folks and she started with it but I afterwards
learned she did not take it to the right
place. I dreamed something about
Cora, though she was not the messenger
I sent with the cloak – Cora went on the
journey I expected to take – and I saw
the figures 8 7 which I understood meant
it would cost her eighty seven dollars to
buy her ticket. – I also dreamed of seeing
milk several times once when I set down
after I had set there a little while I looked and
there I was sitting in a great pan of milk.
The pan was as big as a dish pan, and I exclaimed
was (?) I a witch! Feb. 7 1885
Carrie A. Noyes

Courtesy of Nancy Benton. Transcribed by JMK. Nancy Benton notes Carrie
had cut apart an envelope that had contained a letter addressed to
herself and written this on the inside.

32. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Marriage Record, Cir 1885.
(28)
Recorded probably c. 1885 by Caroline Atwell, about
the same time of her recording Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell
family bible 17 Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

33. Accessory Document: Hiram Awell Family Death Record, Circa 1885. (13)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by
Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17
Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

34. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Record, Cir 1885. (16)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from
Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

35. Accessory Document: Family Record of James Allen Noyes, Cir 1885.
(35)
Recorded by Caroline Atwell c. 1885. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

36. Child’s Death: Victor Hugo dies of Yellow Fever., 1886 Oct 23.

37. Correspondence: Correspondance with Cora, Bef 1887. (50)
Envelopes to Carrie, apparently from Cora, from Wichita, Mcpherson,
Omaha, Lincoln, and one in an Envelop with return of McPherson Steam
Laundry in Wichita. Wonder if Cora worked there at one time? One dated
Apr 14, 1893 from Scranton, PA, has a note on one side “Containing Frank
Greene’s death…”

SOURCE: Nancy Benton 2 May 2003

38. Correspondence: Letter to Allen Noyes describing an accident Ray
had., 1887 Jul 23, Liberal, Barton, Missouri. (51)


CARRIE NOYES LETTER TO ALLEN NOYES 1887
Liberal, Barton Co. Missouri
July 23d 1887
Ray Noyes was 13 at the time of this incident.

Dear Allen

You said if anything happened to write you at Sunny Dale. Something
serious has happened. The colt Rustus (?) kicked Ray in the belly
yesterday morning between half past six and seven o’clock. We had Dr.
Clark here by half past eight. He said there were no bones broken and it
was not a serious case. He dont get any better. We gave him a pack last
night and a pill this morning. He has pain in the bowels all the time and
sometimes it is very bad for a short time. He had a pail on his arm when
he was kicked and Rustus foot hit the pail and the pail pressed against
the side and belly. It knocked him over, but he got up himself and ran
out of the yard and laid down on the ground outside of the gate,
afterwards he walked in the house. Your Father saw it all and came in the
house with him. I would have waited longer before writing you but am
afraid you will not get my letter if I delay as they only get mail at
Sunny Dale two or three times a week. I must not spend any more time
writing. Hope you are well and having a good time.

Your mother

Carrie A. Noyes

Courtesy of Nancy Benton. Transcribed by JMK.

39. Child’s Death: Cora Rachel dies in childbirth., 1887 Oct 15.

40. Deed: 1888. (50)
There is an envelope to Carrie, dated 1888 from the Recorder of Deeds
in Lamar, MO. Must have contained the deed to their place.

SOURCE: Nancy Benton 2 May 2003

41. She traveled in 1891 in Chehalis, Lewis, Washington.
Carrie must have visited Viola in Chehalis, Wa in 1891. There is an
envelope addressed to her there.

SOURCE: Nancy Benton 2 May 2003

42. Correspondence: Letter from Caroline Atwell Noyes to Ray Noyes, 1892
Apr 23, Oklahoma, Miller. (52)


Miller Oklahoma April 23, 1892

Dear Ray. — I thought you would like to hear from Allens place I will
write you a little.

Allens wheat is looking pretty well. There are twenty acres of wheat
twenty seven of corn and dont know how many of oats and plenty of
potatoes onions and peas. All up and looking well. The little trees and
bushes you sent Allen are growing.

Allen has brought a cow and calf. The cow gives about three gallons a
day but the calf gets over half and he is fat and pretty. We make butter
enough to do us very well. (?) has a nice colt a week old. The mules
and pony and

(2)

colt are all doing well. The grass is up green where it has been burnt.
Allen burnt his pasture some time ago.

I suppose you have read in the paper about the opening of the new indian
land. I have not seen any paper that tell about it but Allen went to
Elreno and saw the race. There were five new counties come in and a
great many went to get lots in the county seats. Bert went and has not
got back yet. There was a hard shower and hail storm here the 19th but
it was local. I understand it did not rain at all in the new country.
It has rained a little to day and Allen think we will have a hard rain
before it gets through. One of Allens hens wants to set. We consider
that a great event.

Your mother

C. A. N.

43. Correspondence: From Ray Noyes to Caroline Atwell Noyes, 1892 Oct 17.
(53)

Liberal MO Oct
17, 92

Mrs. C. A. Noyes

Dear Mother

Well Paul has given up the place and he and Edna left today.

Now the place is open and free for you to come and live here. I would be
glad if you would come and be with us at home again

Every thing is getting along fine and we are all well.

There is not any news to tell that I know of I will expect to hear from
you immediately

Ray Noyes

44. Death: 1894 Apr 18 Liberal, Barton, Missouri. (36)
Date of death, not place, is given by the family record of “Deaths of the
family of James A. and Carrie A. Noyes”. Caroline’s mother had died 17
April 1843, 51 years and a day beforehand. It was also the day of her
demised sister Sarah’s birthday.

45. Cemetery: Liberal Cemetery, Liberal, Barton, Missouri 1894 Apr. (54)

Courtesy of Nancy Bryant.

46. Accessory Document: Caroline Atwell History by Pansy Noyes Bryant,
1953. (14)

47. Subscriptions: There are several post cards from “The Sun” in New
York City relating to Carrie’s subscription.
SOURCE: Nancy Benton 27 April 2003

The Sun was the first of the Penny Press, a mass publication aimed at a
large number of readers.


5 M John Atwell (8)
Born: 1836
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Possible Child:
John is not given in the Family Record that Caroline Atwell Noyes created
for her family, but in the 1850 census a 14 year old male appears, and in
the 1840 census there is a male aged 5 to 10, probably the same
individual. He is possibly a sibling of Caroline of whom she didn’t make
a record.

2. Name: If John is a child of Hiram and Rachel, he would be a namesake
for Hiram’s eldest brother, John.

3. Census: Pg. 357 1840 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (12)

An unknown male age 5 to 10 appears in the 1840 census. Then in the 1850
census there is a 14 year old male named John.

Roll: M704_546, Image 292, Page 357
Hiram ATWELL – 1 – – – 1 – – – – – – – / – 2 1 – –
1

1 male 5 to 10, (which would be John most likely?, Hiram Jr. being
already dead), 1 male 30 to 40 (Hiram); 2 females 5 to 10 (would be
Sarah and Caroline), 1 female 10 to 15 would be ?, and a female 30 to
40.

4. Census: Pg. 298 1850 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (8)

Recorded 28 August 1850
6 1869/1879 Hiram ATWELL 48 m farmer $2000 b. VT
7 Metilda 44 f b. VT
8 Sarah A. 16 f attended school b. VT
9 John 14 m attended school b. VT
10 Caroline 12 f attended school b. VT
11 Mary 9 f attended school b. VT

12 1870 1880 Sarah BRYAN 55 f $10,000 b. MA
13 Lorna 26 f b. VT
14 Mary 16 f attended school b. VT
15 John 11 m attended school b. VT
16 George S. 26 m Farmer Married within the year b. VT
17 Milissa A 21 f married within the year b. VT

Sarah Sally SCAGEL, a sister of Rachel, who married Orson BRYAN, is
living next door. Another SCAGGEL in the census is on page 297A, which
is Thomas SCAGGELL, a brother of Rachel’s mother.

The “year” being recorded was from 2 June 1849 to June 1 1850, so that is
why Hiram appears, his death on 2 Dec 1849 falling midway. The date the
recording was made was thus August 1849 though for the 1850 census.

5. Edit : 2003 Oct.


6 F Mary Atwell
Born: Abt 1841 (8)
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Possible Child:
Mary appears in 1850 census. I don’t know if parentage is Hiram and
Rachel, or Metilda and a former husband, though it seems if Mary was by a
former marriage of Metilda’s she would be listed under her father’s name,
unless she had been adopted.

2. Census: Pg. 298 1850 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA.

Recorded 28 August 1850
6 1869/1879 Hiram ATWELL 48 m farmer $2000 b. VT
7 Metilda 44 f b. VT
8 Sarah A. 16 f attended school b. VT
9 John 14 m attended school b. VT
10 Caroline 12 f attended school b. VT
11 Mary 9 f attended school b. VT

12 1870 1880 Sarah BRYAN 55 f $10,000 b. MA
13 Lorna 26 f b. VT
14 Mary 16 f attended school b. VT
15 John 11 m attended school b. VT
16 George S. 26 m Farmer Married within the year b. VT
17 Milissa A 21 f married within the year b. VT

Sarah Sally SCAGEL, a sister of Rachel, who married Orson BRYAN, is
living next door. Another SCAGGEL in the census is on page 297A, which
is Thomas SCAGGELL, a brother of Rachel’s mother.

The “year” being recorded was from 2 June 1849 to June 1 1850, so that is
why Hiram appears, his death on 2 Dec 1849 falling midway. The date the
recording was made was thus August 1849 though for the 1850 census.

3. Edit : 2003 Oct.


7 M Francis Atwell (16)
Born: 1843 Apr 11 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA
Christened:
Died: 1843 Apr 20 – Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA (13)
Buried: – Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center, Washington,
Vermont, USA (55)
Spouse:
Marr. Date:


Events


1. Birth: 1843 Apr 11 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (16)

From Caroline Atwell Noyes’ record. She does not however supply the
birth place which is assumed.

2. Name: Francis was perhaps a namesake for his uncle Francis SCAGEL who
was born 1810 and died 1812.

3. Death: 1843 Apr 20 Waterbury Center, Washington, Vermont, USA. (13)

Caroline Atwell Noyes records, “Francis son of Hiram and Rachel Awell
died in Waterbury Vermont April 10 1843 aged 10 days.”

4. Cemetery: ? Old Waterbury Center Cemetery, Waterbury Center,
Washington, Vermont, USA. (15)
Buried at the Old Waterbury Center Cemetery at Waterbury, Washington Co.
VT.

Hiram Atwell d Dec 2,1849, AE 48 yrs 8 mos
Rachel Scagel, his wife, d Apr 17, 1843, AE 41 yrs
Francis Atwell, their son, d Apr 20, 1843, AE 10 days
Hiram Atwell, their son, d July 23, 1834, AE 1 yr, 8 mo 18 days

5. Accessory Document: Caroline Atwell History by Pansy Noyes Bryant.
(14)

6. Accessory Document: Hiram Atwell Family Record, Cir 1885. (16)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by Caroline Atwell from
Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17 Feb of 1883.
Courtesy of Nancy Benton.

7. Accessory Document: Hiram Awell Family Death Record, Cir 1885. (13)
Recorded probably March 1 of 1885 by
Caroline Atwell from Asher Atwell’s copying of the Atwell family bible 17
Feb of 1883. Courtesy of Nancy Benton.



Sources

1. Atwell Family Members, Old Atwell Family BIble (Asher E. Atwell copied Feb.
17, 1883. Caroline Atwell NOYES made a copy from his record on March 1,
1885. Digital copy passed to jk of Caroline’s document in possession of
Nancy Benton 2003.) …. Pansy Noyes Bryant, Caroline Atwell History
(1953. Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, 2003).
2. Atwell Family Members, Old Atwell Family BIble (Asher E. Atwell copied Feb.
17, 1883. Caroline Atwell NOYES made a copy from his record on March 1,
1885. Digital copy passed to jk of Caroline’s document in possession of
Nancy Benton 2003.)
3. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Deaths of the Family of Nathan and Lydia Atwell (Feb
17 1883 copied by Asher E. Atwell from old family bible; copied March 1
1883 by Caroline Atwell Noyes. Digital copy transmitted to jk of original
in possession of Nancy Benton in 2003.)
4. Burials at the Waterbury Cemetery, Vermont
(http://www.rootsweb.com/~vtwashin/cemOldWaterburyCtr.htm).
5. The National Society of the Daughters of the Americal Revolution, Volume
100, Page 109. …. Atwell Family Members, Old Atwell Family BIble (Asher
E. Atwell copied Feb. 17, 1883. Caroline Atwell NOYES made a copy from
his record on March 1, 1885. Digital copy passed to jk of Caroline’s
document in possession of Nancy Benton 2003.) …. Nancy Benton genealogy
database drawn from various sources, some unnoted. Grace Noyes Pinkerton
b. 1892, did much recording during the mid 1900s, Nancy Benton assisting
and later augmenting. Pansy Noyes Bryant contributed greatly, mother of
Nancy Benton, Noyes-Brewer Genealogy with Associated Families (2003 Word
Document file). …. Isaac Cummings Family Association – Mary Rosenbach,
compiler, Descendants of Isaac Cummings 1601-1677 (Worldconnect).
6. The National Society of the Daughters of the Americal Revolution, Volume
100, Page 109. …. Atwell Family Members, Old Atwell Family BIble (Asher
E. Atwell copied Feb. 17, 1883. Caroline Atwell NOYES made a copy from
his record on March 1, 1885. Digital copy passed to jk of Caroline’s
document in possession of Nancy Benton 2003.)
7. Caroline Atwell, Marriages of the Children of Nathan and Lydia Atwell (c.
1885. Digital copy received from Nancy Benton, possessor of the original
document in 2003).
8. Vermont, Washington County, 1850 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
9. Unknown photographer, Hiram Atwell (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton
2003).
10. 1820 U.S. Census – VT, Franklin Co.
11. Perkins Museum of Geology at the University of Vermont, Uncredited old
postcard of Waterbury, Washington County, Vermont. …. Copyright
deposit; Henry Barreuther; August 27, 1914; DLC/PP-1914:44831, Panoramic
Photograph Waterbury, Vermont c. 1914 (American Memory,
http://memory.loc.gov).
12. Vermont, Washington County, 1840 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
13. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Deaths of the family of Hiram and Rachel Atwell
(Digital copy of (probably) 1885 document, in possession of Nancy Benton
2003.)
14. Pansy Noyes Bryant, Caroline Atwell History (1953. Digital copy courtesy
of Nancy Benton, 2003).
15. Burials at the Waterbury Cemetery, Vermont
(http://www.rootsweb.com/~vtwashin/cemOldWaterburyCtr.htm). …. Bob
Morse, Bob Morse to jk (Oct 21 2003).
16. Caroline Atwell, The Family Record of Hiram and Rachel Atwell (Digital copy
of Caroline Atwell Noyes’ 1885 (perhaps March 1st) record courtesy of
Nancy Benton, possessor of original document in 2003.)
17. R. M. McIntosh Studio, Northfield, Washington County, Vermont,
Unidentified Cartes-de-visite image of girl with curly hair from the
belongings of Caroline Atwell Noyes. (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy
Benton, 2003). …. R. M. McIntosh studio, Northfield, Washington County,
Vermont, Unidentified girl and woman, Cartes-de-visite image from
belongings of Caroline Atwell Noyes (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy
Benton, 2003). …. R. M. McIntosh studio, Unidentified Atwell
Cartes-de-visite image, taken at the studio of R. M. McIntosh in
Northfield, VT. (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, 2003.)
18. S. O. Hersey Studio, Montpelier, Washington County, Vermont, Unidentified
girl in Cartes-de-visite image from collection of Caroline Atwell Noyes.
(Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, 2003.)
19. Atkinsons Railroad Gallery, Unidentified image of woman in
cartes-de-visite. (Atkinsons Railroad Gallery. Digital copy courtesy of
Nancy Benton, 2003.)
20. Caroline Atwell, The Family Record of Hiram and Rachel Atwell (Digital copy
of Caroline Atwell Noyes’ 1885 (perhaps March 1st) record courtesy of
Nancy Benton, possessor of original document in 2003.) …. Pansy Noyes
Bryant, Caroline Atwell History (1953. Digital copy courtesy of Nancy
Benton, 2003).
21. Robert Morse, Waterbury Cemetery Inscriptions, Washington County Vermont

Washington County Vermont (Robert Morse 550 Coburn RD, Plainfield, VT
05667). …. Bob Morse, Bob Morse to jk (Oct 21 2003).
22. Edited by Theodore Graham Lewis, HISTORY OF WATERBURY. 1763-1915..(1915)
23. Nancy Benton genealogy database drawn from various sources, some unnoted.
Grace Noyes Pinkerton b. 1892, did much recording during the mid 1900s,
Nancy Benton assisting and later augmenting. Pansy Noyes Bryant
contributed greatly, mother of Nancy Benton, Noyes-Brewer Genealogy with
Associated Families (2003 Word Document file).
24. Vermont, Caledonia County, 1810 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
25. Vermont, Washington County, 1820 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
26. Census.
27. Vermont, Washington County, 1870 U.S. Federal Census Population Scheudle
(Images at Ancestry.com). …. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Marriages of the
Children of Hiram and Rachel Atwell (Digital copy from (probably) 1885
document in the possession of Nancy Benton, 2003.) …. Sarah Lydia
Atwell, Letter from Sarah Atwell to her sister Caroline Atwell Noyes (21
November 1876. Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, 2003).
28. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Marriages of the Children of Hiram and Rachel Atwell
(Digital copy from (probably) 1885 document in the possession of Nancy
Benton, 2003.)
29. Unknown photographer, Sarah Atwell Gilbert (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy
Benton, possessor of the original in 2003.) …. Joan Nunn, Fashion in
Costume, 1200-2000. 2nd edition. (A & C Black (Publishers) Ltd; Chicago:
New Amsterdam Books, 2000.)
30. Vermont, Washington County, 1870 U.S. Federal Census Population Scheudle
(Images at Ancestry.com).
31. Sarah Atwell Gilbert, Business Circular for Sarah Atwell Gilbert’s
Millinery Shop (10 April 1873. Digital image courtesy of Nancy Benton,
2003).
32. Sarah Lydia Atwell, Letter from Sarah Atwell to her sister Caroline Atwell
Noyes (21 November 1876. Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, 2003).
33. Nancy Benton, Nancy Benton to jk. …. Nancy Benton genealogy database
drawn from various sources, some unnoted. Grace Noyes Pinkerton b. 1892,
did much recording during the mid 1900s, Nancy Benton assisting and later
augmenting. Pansy Noyes Bryant contributed greatly, mother of Nancy
Benton, Noyes-Brewer Genealogy with Associated Families (2003 Word
Document file).
34. Nancy Benton.
35. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Family Record for James A. Noyes (Transcribed 2003
by jk from a scan of the original in the possession of Nancy Benton.
Year of original record is unknown but was perhaps abt. 1885 when Carrie
transcribed the Nathan Atwell Family Record from the Atwell Family Bible.
Handwriting and condition of paper appears about the same.)
36. Carrie Atwell Noyes and following generations, Deaths of the Family of
James A. Noyes and Carrie A. Noyes (Transcribed 2003 by jk from scan of
original document in possession of descendant Nancy Benton.)
37. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Family Record for James A. Noyes (Transcribed 2003
by jk from a scan of the original in the possession of Nancy Benton.
Year of original record is unknown but was perhaps abt. 1885 when Carrie
transcribed the Nathan Atwell Family Record from the Atwell Family Bible.
Handwriting and condition of paper appears about the same.) …. Caroline
Atwell Noyes, Marriages of the Children of Hiram and Rachel Atwell
(Digital copy from (probably) 1885 document in the possession of Nancy
Benton, 2003.)
38. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Family Record for James A. Noyes (Transcribed 2003
by jk from a scan of the original in the possession of Nancy Benton.
Year of original record is unknown but was perhaps abt. 1885 when Carrie
transcribed the Nathan Atwell Family Record from the Atwell Family Bible.
Handwriting and condition of paper appears about the same.) …. Caroline
Atwell, The Family Record of Hiram and Rachel Atwell (Digital copy of
Caroline Atwell Noyes’ 1885 (perhaps March 1st) record courtesy of Nancy
Benton, possessor of original document in 2003.)
39. Unknown photographer, Photo of Caroline Atwell Noyes in middle age (Digital
copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, possessor of the original image in 2003.)
40. Pacific Mills Document, June 25 1854 (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton
2003).
41. John Humphrey Noyes, The Putnam Community (Compiled and edited by George
Wallingford Noyes).
42. Michigan, Kalamazoo County, 1860 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
43. Unknown photographer, James Allen and Caroline Noyes, Emma Viola and Cora,
c. 1866 (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, possessor of the original
in 2003.)
44. Illinois, Union County, 1870 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
45. N. West Gilbert, Letter from N. West Gilbert to Sarah Atwell Noyes (18 Apr
1879, Boston, MA. Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton 2003.)
46. Illinois, Union County, 1880 U.S. Federal Census Population Schedule
(Images at Ancestry.com).
47. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Caroline Atwell Noyes’ journal of the trip from
Anna, Illinois to Liberal, Missouri, August 1882. (Copy courtesy of Nancy
Benton, 2003.)
48. Family of James Allen Noyes, Noyes Family Constitution (c. 1883. Digital
copy courtesy of Nancy Benton).
49. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Caroline Atwell Noyes dream record, 7 Feb 1885
(Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton, 2003).
50. Nancy Benton, Nancy Benton email to jk (May 2 2003).
51. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Caroline Atwell Noyes to son Allen Marble Noyes, 23
July 1887 (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton 2003).
52. Caroline Atwell Noyes, Caroline Atwell Noyes to son Ray Noyes, 23 April
1892 (Digital copy courtesy of Nancy Benton).
53. Ray Noyes, Ray Noyes to Caroline Atwell Noyes, 17 Oct 1892 (Digital copy
courtesy of Nancy Benton 2003).
54. James and Carrie (Atwell) Noyes Tombstone, Liberal Cemetery, Liberal,
Barton County, Missouri (Digital copy of photo courtesy of Nancy Benton,
2003).
55. WATERBURY CEMETERY INSCRIPTIONS WASHINGTON COUNTY VERMONT
(http://www.rootsweb.com/~vtwashin/cemOldWaterburyCtr.htm).

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