William France Hackney and Flora Ellen Anderson

William France Hackney, born Feb 28 1850 in Iowa, died Oct 26 1915 in Washington County, Kansas, was a son of William S. Hackney and Mary Jane Enlow. On April 10 1872 in Van Buren County, Iowa he married Flora Ellen Anderson, daughter of Foster Anderson and Mary Ann Hardesty. Mary Ann Hardesty’s parents appear to have been a William Hardesty b. abt 1800 and a Mary.

Annals of Iowa
Volume 1 No. 9 January 1865
History of Davis County, Iowa
by Capt. Hosea B. Horn of Bloomfield
Chapter II

In the year 1838, Mr. William Hardesty came to this county and settled onthe disputed territory near the line of Van Buren county. He was from Fountain county, Indiana, and came to the territory of Iowa in company with Uriah Biggs, Esq., who had a contract with the United States government for surveying certain public lands of the “Black Hawk purchase.” He settled on a small stream called Henry Creek, where he lived and died…In the autumn of 1840 Mr. Haden Smith and Mr. William F. Johnson came up from Van Buren…and settled “claims”…This was some two years and a half before the whites were permitted by law to settle on the “purchase.” Hence those adventurers were surrounded on all sides by the Sac and Fox Indians. They were friendly, however, and assisted the squatters to raise their cabins, capture wild game, hunt bees & c., and many of them took a pride in doing so. Some ten or a dozen Indians were present and assisted Mr. Johnson to raise his cabin.

In the 1850 Lick Creek, Van Buren, Iowa census, Foster Anderson was living a couple of doors from Job Yarnell, an assumed relation of Eli Yarnell, father-in-law of William McKenney who is believed to be a brother of our ancestor, George W. McKenney Sr.

I’m just going to take the lazy way out and give a straight out report here from the genealogy file I have on them.

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Husband: William France Hackney
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Born: 1850 Feb 28 – , , Iowa
Christened:
Died: 1915 Oct 26
Buried: – Washington Cemetery, Washington, Washington, Kansas
Father: William S. + Hackney (1820-1891)
Mother: Mary Jane + Enlow (1824-1895)
Marriage: 1872 Apr 10 Place: , Van Buren, Iowa
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Events
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1. Birth: 1850 Feb 28 , , Iowa.

2. Name: William S had a sister Isabel Francis. Perhaps she and William
France were named for a France or Francis in the family. Isabel’s first
son was named Francis (Frank) I would think that Isabel had been named
for another Francis in the family. Theodore, another sibling of William
S., named his son Frank.

The family bible (Lloyd Clinton McKenney) gives his middle name appearing
to have been France but this is difficult to make out. It could instead be Frances.

3. Census: 1856 Lick Creek, Van Buren, Iowa. Iowa, Van Buren County,
Lick Creek Township
Pg. 300
John SEARS PA trader and Rosan (his is illegible age, perhaps 58)
90/91 Ann LUCAS 60 PA
William HACKNEY 34 OH farmer
Mary J. 32?
Amos S. 15 IA
William F. 5
James 4
92/92 Perrs M. 1
John VANSEL 34 IL and Lydia from IN
Martha 7 IL and children
93/93 Elizabeth WILBERN 49 OH and family

97/97 Bluet PARTLOW 50 OH
Letta 33 IN
Jams 11? IA
Emilin HALE 4
Marshall HALE 1
98/99 Mary BUCKMASTER 90? from Ireland followed by Cyntha b. PA
100/100 George SHAFFER illegible PA
Margaret 53?
Jacob 21 OH
illegible 18
Elizabeth 12
illegible female
H. D. SHAFFER 30?
Nancy J. 21 PA
Others following, David Carson, St. Leger Stout.

4. Census: 1860 Lick Creek, Van Buren, Iowa. 1860 VAN BUREN CO., IA
CENSUS
pg. 295 LICK CREEK TOWNSHIP (pg. 145 ancestry.com)
8 June 1860
319/331 PARTLOW
320/332 GODOWN Mark (OH) and Mahala (PA)
321/333 SCHAEFFER J. (OH) and Elizabeth (OH)
322/334 CARSON D. G. (VA) and Sarah (OH)
323/335 HACKNEY Wm. J. 40 m. farmer $90 $200 b. OH
Mary J. 36 f b. OH
HACKNEY Amos S. 17 b. IA
HACKNEY William 10 b. IA
HACKNEY Parris 6 b. IA
HACKNEY Sarah 2 b. IA

5. Census: 1870 Union, Van Buren, Iowa. W. HACKNEY is here given as born
in PA, but it is actually W. HACKNEY born in IA. He is a workman
blacksmith and is a blacksmith in the 1880 census.

1870
Lick Creek Township
Birmingham Post Office
8 June 1870
pg. 300
147/140 HACKNEY William S. 50 m w Farmer $610 personal b. OH
Mary J. 43 f w Keeping House b. OH
Paris W. 15 mw Farm Laborer b. IA att school
Sarah E. 12 fw At home b. IA att school
Susan 9 fw b. IA att school
George R. 6 mw b. IA att school
3 June 1870
Birmingham Union Township
Birmingham PO
84/84 THOMPSON E. 62 fw keeping house $1000 $1100 b. PA
HACKNEY W. 19 mw Workmen Blacksmith b. PA
SADDLES ? 16 mw Apprentice wagonmaker b. IL widowed

6. Occupation: Workman Blacksmith 1870.

7. Marriage: Married at the age of 22., 1872 Apr 10, , Van Buren, Iowa.
Early Van Buren Co. Marriages
http://www.rootsweb.com/~iavanbur/VBCmarriages_HIJ.html
Hackney, W. F. Anderson, Flora 4/10/1872

Marriage date is also recorded in the family bible.

8. Business: Blacksmith shop, 1876, Washington, Washington, Kansas. The
city in 1876 contained 600 inhabitants. It had three hotels — the
Washington House, by C. Albright, the Central House, by George H. Wilkes,
and the American House, by Mrs. Stevens; five stores of general
merchandise, kept by Barley & Young, Dr. Walden, Smith, Holcomb & Co.,
James S. Vedder & Co., and E. D. & A. W. Moore & Co.; one bank, loan and
real estate agency, by Shriner Brothers; one furniture store, by J. C.
McCew; two groceries, by Penwell & Tucker and John Bilsc; one restaurant
for the sale of fancy groceries and confectionery, by John Crider; two
billiard halls, by Peter Erb and Miller & Allen; two blacksmith shops, by
W. F. Hackney and John Drape.

http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/washingt/70th-3.htm#WASHINGTON

9. Census: 1880 Washington, Washington, Kansas. 1880 KS Washington,
Washington census
pb. 498D
William HACKNEY 30 IA blacksmith
Flora Ellen 27 IA father b. PA mother b. IL
Enid Mable 7 b. IA
Lula Belle 2 b. KS

10. Occupation: Blacksmith 1880.

11. Census: 1900 , Washington, Kansas. Year: 1900; Census Place:
Washington, Washington, Kansas; Roll: T623 503; Page:
2B; Enumeration District: 146.

53/53 HACKNEY William head Feb 1850 50 b. IA parents unk
Laura E. wife April 1853 47 9 of 9 children living b. IA father b. PA
mother b. IN
Lulu B daughter June 1878 21 b. KS parents b. IA
Joe L. daughter May 1886 14 b. KS parents b. IA
Mildred L. daughter July 1892 7 b. KS parents b. IA

12. Census: 1910 Washington, Washington, Kansas. Source Citation: Year:
1910; Census Place: Washington, Washington, Kansas; Roll: T624_459; Page:
2B; Enumeration District: 162; Image: 973.
47/47 WRIGHT George A. 44 md 15 b. OH parents b. OH
Enid A wife 36 md 15 1 child b. IA parents b. IA
Mildred daughter 7 b. MO father b. OH mother b. IA
48/48 HACKNEY William 60 md 38 b. IA parents b. OH
Flora E. 57 md 38 4 of 4 children surviving b. IA father b. PA mother b.
IN
Mildred 17 b. KS parents b. IA
ANDERSON William W. brother-in-law widowed 58 b. IA father b. PA mother b.
IN

13. Death: 1915 Oct 28. Died at the age of 65.

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Wife: Flora Ellen Anderson
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AKA: Flora Hackney
Born: 1853 circa – , , Iowa
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Father: Foster Anderson (1825-1918)
Mother: Mary Ann Hardesty (1830-1873)
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Events
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1. Census: 1860 Union, Van Buren, Iowa. Source Citation: Year: 1860;
Census Place: Union, Van Buren, Iowa; Roll: M653_342; Page: 127; Image:
372.
779/788 Foster ANDERSON 36 carpenter1300 175 PA
Mary A 31 IN
FLora C 7 IA
Wm W 9
Henrietta 5
Clara B 3
Osckar 10/12

2. Census: 1870 Lick Creek, Van Buren, Iowa. Source Citation: Year:
1870; Census Place: Lick Creek, Van Buren, Iowa; Roll: M593_421; Page:
302; Image: 604.
Daniel RENECKER household
145/168 ANDERSON Foster 44 farmer 3200 920 PA
Mary A. 41 IN
William W. 18 IA
Ellen F 14
Hamilton 15
Carri B 12
Oscar 9
Mary J 8
Nettie 6
James W 4
illegible 1 (female?)

3. Census: 1880 Washington, Washington, Kansas.

4. Census: 1900 , Washington, Kansas. Year: 1900; Census Place:
Washington, Washington, Kansas; Roll: T623 503; Page:
2B; Enumeration District: 146.

53/53 HACKNEY William head Feb 1850 50 b. IA parents unk
Laura E. wife April 1853 47 9 of 9 children living b. IA father b. PA
mother b. IN
Lulu B daughter June 1878 21 b. KS parents b. IA
Joe L. daughter May 1886 14 b. KS parents b. IA
Mildred L. daughter July 1892 7 b. KS parents b. IA

5. Census: 1910 Washington, Washington, Kansas. Source Citation: Year:
1910; Census Place: Washington, Washington, Kansas; Roll: T624_459; Page:
2B; Enumeration District: 162; Image: 973.
47/47 WRIGHT George A. 44 md 15 b. OH parents b. OH
Enid A wife 36 md 15 1 child b. IA parents b. IA
Mildred daughter 7 b. MO father b. OH mother b. IA
48/48 HACKNEY William 60 md 38 b. IA parents b. OH
Flora E. 57 md 38 4 of 4 children surviving b. IA father b. PA mother b.
IN
Mildred 17 b. KS parents b. IA
ANDERSON William W. brother-in-law widowed 58 b. IA father b. PA mother b.
IN

6. Census: 1920 Washington, Washington, Kansas. 2nd January
Sheet 1B
201 18/18 HACKNEY Flora Head own free fw 66 wd b. IA father b. PA mother
b. IN
Mildred daughter fw 27 sg b. KS father b. IA mother b. IA Trimmer at a
Millinery Store for wages
19 WRIGHT George A. rent mw 54 md b. OH father b. PA mother b. OH
Commercial (trimmer?) Calendars for wages
Enid wife fw 46 md b. IA father b. IA mother b. IA
Mildred daughter fw 17 sg b. MO father b. OH mother b. IA

7. Census: 1930 District 34, Washington, Washington, Kansas. April 23
Sheet 3A
201/62/62 HACKNEY Flora Head own $3500 has radio, doesn’t live on farm
fw 77 wd 19 b. IA father b. PA mother b. IN
Mildred Daughter fw 38 single b. KS parents b. IA Clerk at post office
WRIGHT George A. Son in law mw 63 md. 21 b. OH parents b. PA Salesman
(can’t read for what) not a veteran
Enid Daughter fw 57 m 21 b. IA parents b. IA

8. Property: Home valued at $3500 1930.

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Children
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1 F Enid Mable Hackney
Born: 1873 – , , Iowa
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse: George A. Wright (1866- )
Marr. Date: Bef 1903
Spouse:
Marr. Date:
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2 F Lula Belle Hackney
Born: 1878 – , , Kansas
Christened:
Died: 1914
Buried: – Washington Cemetery, Washington, Washington, Kansas
Spouse: Algie ( – )
Marr. Date:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:
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3 F Joe L. Hackney
Born: 1886 – , , Kansas
Christened:
Died: Unknown
Buried:
Spouse:
Marr. Date:
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4 F Mildred Hackney
Born: 1892 Jul 4 – , , Kansas
Christened:
Died: 1984 Aug – Long Beach, Los Angeles, California
Buried: – Washington Cemetery, Washington, Washington, Kansas
Spouse:
Marr. Date:
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General Notes: Husband –
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William is mentioned below as having a blacksmith shop in Washington KS by
1876.

http://skyways.lib.ks.us/genweb/washingt/70th-3.htm#WASHINGTON

WASHINGTON

Town Company Organized County Seat In 1859

Washington, the county seat of Washington County, is situated in the valley of
Mill Creek, one mile north of the geographical center. Three different towns
were rivals for the county seat. The first was at the center, the second was on
Mill Creek, close to James McNulty’s, and the third the present site. An
election was held in April, 1860, the result being in favor of the present
location. The town was organized September, 1859. The incorporators were Geo.
G. Pierce, H. Lott, James W. Darby, R. C. Darby and David E. Ballard. In
September 1869 Colonel Bowen acquired an interest by the assignment of R. C.
Darby. D. E. Ballard played a prominent part in the history, development and
progress of the county and city. He was the only commissioned officer who went
out of Washington county during the war. His past efforts in our interests, as
well as his last in aid of our railroad enterprises, should always be
remembered in a spirit of just appreciation. The first house was built by Mr.
Ballard and George Pierce. It was also the first school house, and second
hotel.

The second house built and occupied was by Thomas Bowen, at Mr. Melvin’s
blacksmith shop, a log cabin 12 by 14 feet. Later it was the headquarters of
McClimate, one of the New York colony that was driven back by the Indians from
White Rock in 1870. In this cabin was also the first store; goods were sold out
of a big box when needed, shelves being superfluous. Mr. Woolbert, sr., built
the first hotel. It was made of logs, put up endwise, stockade fashion, and six
inches thick. It was afterwards sold to the county for a temporary court house.
Burning down in the spring of 1869, it was rebuilt by the county in 1871,
burning again, December 15, 1872, rebuilt again by the Insurance Company July
1, 1873.

The first land broken on the site was on block twenty-nine, previous to proving
up on the land. There were living on the townsite, at that time, Elgin
Richards, who proved up on the east 1/2 of the northwest 14 of Section 1, and
the north 1/2 of the northeast 1/4 of Section 2, also Christian Strohm who
entered the east half of the northeast 1/4 of Section 11, and the south half of
the northeast 1/4 of section 2, each one proving up separately, and then
deeding their land to the above named company. The 80 acres of land lying south
of East Washington was then part of the town site. D. E. Ballard afterward
bought up the lots and sold them to S. F. Snider, who sold them to Mr.
Sprengle.

James McNulty and D. E. Ballard built and kept the first regular dry goods
stores. At that time they had mail once a week from Marysville. It was kept in
a candle box with two partitions in it. As late as 1859, deer, elk and antelope
were to be seen close to the city limits. When the war broke out Geo. G. Pierce
and Thos. Bowen went into the U.S. Army, leaving the town in charge of D. E.
Ballard, under the laws of the State governing the same. A partial drawing of
lots was made on August 22, 1860, and others set aside to give away to them
that would build. Other lots were given to the county in consideration of the
county seat being located here.

The war arrested for a time the growth of the town, but in 1866 immigration
commenced pouring in. Geo. W. Shriner and Dr. Chas. Williamson of Atchison
county, Kansas, located in Washington in the summer of 1866, and two years
later James F. Tallman and Charles Smith arrived. The stone school house was
built in 1869, being the first school district in the county that voted bonds.
In 1867 was started the first pioneer drug store by Mrs. S. A. Williamson. The
streets were then lined with white topped immigrant wagons. We had but one main
street, and Saturday was gala day. The Mill creek boys ran foot and horse
races, and the rest, all being on an equality — poor alike — sat.around,
braced up each other’s courage, talked politics, and felt better over the
glorious future of the town and county.
The advent of Mark J. Kelley and his Observer a little 7 by 9 newspaper, was a
turning point in our history that should be properly appreciated. It was full
of locals week after week, and advertising the county in glowing colors. It
found its way to the home of Chris Albright in Wisconsin and J. W. Barley in
Ohio. The pen jottings of irrepressible Mark J. Kelley went everywhere into
Eastern homes, and immigration poured in as a sequel. And no wonder; in the
editor’s sanctum might be found the lawyer, the doctor, legislator and future
judge, for Andrew S. Wilson had just moved in from Springfield, Ill. They wrote
copy, corrected proof, distributed ink, forded papers, and as printers call it,
played the “devil” generally.

The city in 1876 contained 600 inhabitants. It had three hotels — the
Washington House, by C. Albright, the Central House, by George H. Wilkes, and
the American House, by Mrs. Stevens; five stores of general merchandise, kept
by Barley & Young, Dr. Walden, Smith, Holcomb & Co., James S. Vedder & Co., and
E. D. & A. W. Moore & Co.; one bank, loan and real estate agency, by Shriner
Brothers; one furniture store, by J. C. McCew; two groceries, by Penwell &
Tucker and John Bilsc; one restaurant for the sale of fancy groceries and
confectionery, by John Crider; two billiard halls, by Peter Erb and Miller &
Allen; two blacksmith shops, by W. F. Hackney and John Draper; two harness
shops, by John R. Pruden and G. E. Ross; two drug stores, by John A. Brown and
William Frank; two jewelers and watchmakers, William Frank and W. Road; two
Boot and Shoe shops, by John W. Ayres and G. A. Caswell; two millinery
establishments, by Miss E. F. Collins and Mrs. John A. Brown; three sewing
machine agencies, by James H. Brown, A. J. Palmer and William Clark; one
butcher shop; one barber shop; one stationery store and post office, by E. N.
Emmons; two livery stables by Samuel Musser and Henry Stevens; one wagon shop,
by Jacob Etter; three boarding houses; three physicians, E. H. Walden, Chas.
Williamson and E. G. Whetstine; one photograph gallery, by E. M. Lewis; one
school house; one hall occupied by the Good Templars, and one by the Masons and
Odd Fellows; one grain elevator and store; two paint shops by S. H. Maunder and
Daniel Lashell; one Presbyterian church; a Methodist Episcopal parsonage. There
were two flouring mills within a half mile of the city, on Mill creek.

William France Hackney’s memorial at Findagrave. Flora Ellen Anderson Hackney’s memorial at Findagrave.

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